Edward Hopper, ‘The Enchantment of Don Quixote (after Gustave Dore)’, ca. 1899, Thurston Royce Gallery of Fine Art, LTD.

Gustave Doré, the well known author and illustrator, had something of Quixote's chivalry in him and spent an arduous life drafting impossible dreams; he knew fame as well as pain, disillusionment, and failure. At age 30 he was ready for Quixote and prepared to realize his dream of illustrating the world's great books.
Doré never became the painter he yearned to be, but he came very close to realizing his desired intimacy with the classics. His sympathy with Cervantes' satire was so close that, of the numerous Quixote interpretations by many outstanding artists, Doré's has become the standard. The French translation of Cervantes that Doré illustrated is forgotten; here is the memorable remnant of that work — all 120 full-page plates, plus a selection of 70 characteristic headpiece and tailpiece vignettes.
As can be seen in the backgrounds, Doré was ready professionally as well as emotionally for Quixote. He had traveled through Spain preparing an earlier work, and his graphic memory was as strong and indelible as that of another great Quixote interpreter, Picasso. From Sancho's village through Spanish hills and dry plateaus, in the Pyrenees and by the sea, in rural castles and Barcelona luxury, Doré illuminated the seventeenth-century setting with a nineteenth-century acquaintance with the scene. Doré was also a careful student of Renaissance costume and architecture; his minutiae, so copious, are invariably correct.

Signature: Initialed, EH, center right

Kennedy Galleries, New York, NY, 1995
Hunter Museum of Art, Chattanooga, Tennessee, 1995
Eaton Fine Art, Palm Beach, Florida, 1997-98

Edward Hopper, a Catalogue Raisonne', Volume 1, Page 106. fig. 1-7b

The artist, until 1967; to his widow, Jo Hopper, until 1968; to the Reverend Arthayer R. Sanborn until 2005, then to the Alexander Gallery, courtesy the Kennedy Gallery until October, 2007, then to a private collection until September, 2010, then to the present owner.

About Edward Hopper

Edward Hopper defined 20th-century realism with his austere, eerie scenes that conveyed the alienation and isolation of modern life. Nighthawks (1942), a painting of three customers sitting at the counter of a diner late at night, is among his most famous works. The illusion of light pervades his paintings, which depict late 19th-century architecture, coastal views, and scenes of the city. Hopper’s characters, even when painted in groups, seem disconnected and lost in thought. "Great art is the outward expression of an inner life in the artist, and this inner life will result in his personal vision of the world," he said.

American, 1882-1967, Nyack, New York, based in Maine, Massachusetts and New York