Emily Lombardo, ‘How they pluck her!, from The Caprichos’, 2014, Childs Gallery

Edition of 12. Plate 21 from the series The Caprichos. Inscribed in the plate top right: '21'; titled in the plate lower center: 'How they pluck her!'. Numbered, signed, and dated in pencil.

The Caprichos, by Emily Lombardo, is a series of etchings which are in direct conversation and homage to Francisco Goya's Los Caprichos, 1799. Both reveal the dark underbelly of cultural movements which ultimately serve to divide society across economic, racial, political, religious, and gender lines. Lombardo brings these issues into contemporary light through a queer feminist lens.

Childs Gallery plans to publish the entire set of 80 plates in six suites, each printed in an edition of twelve. This print is from the second suite. The edition was printed at The Center for Contemporary Printmaking (Norwalk, CT) by printer Paul Deruvo. Hahnemühle Copperplate Bright White paper and Portland Black ink where used for this edition.

Each print can be purchased either individually or as part of a complete boxed set. The second boxed suite includes a handmade book box, the 14 editioned prints, and an etched frontispiece. Individual prints: $500 each / $600 framed. Boxed suite: $5,000. Please inquire for availability.

About Emily Lombardo

Emily Lombardo is best known for “The Caprichos” (2013), a series modeled after Francisco de Goya’s “Los Caprichos” from 1799. Whereas Goya’s etchings addressed Spanish economic, political, and religious troubles during the Age of Enlightenment, Lombardo’s 80 prints highlight contemporary social issues through a queer feminist lens. Using Goya’s work as a point of departure, Lombardo showcases recognizable figures and events—including Miley Cyrus’s act at the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards, Marina Abramovic’s performance The Artist is Present (2010), and Damien Hirst’s diamond skull artworks—to critique the art market, international politics, gender roles, and societal expectations. Lombardo has said that she views appropriation “as a mode of investigating personal and cultural identity, placing marginalized identities in the center or skewing that axis,” and as a central element of the artist apprenticeship tradition.

American, b. 1977, based in Boston, Massachusetts