Ernest Chaplet, ‘Bloody Beautiful’, ca. 1890, Design/Decorative Art, Earthenware, Jason Jacques Gallery
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Ernest Chaplet

Bloody Beautiful, ca. 1890

Earthenware
5 3/4 × 4 in
14.6 × 10.2 cm
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Location
New York
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Jason Jacques Gallery
New York

Small in size but grand in concept, this three-tier vase is covered in a dripping sang de boeuf …

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Ernest Chaplet
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Ernest Chaplet began his career in 1848 as an apprentice at Sèvres, where he studied decoration, design and ceramics techniques. In 1882, after more than 30 years in the employ of large ceramics firms, he opened an atelier where, assisted by Albert-Louis Dammouse and funded by Haviland & Company, he created simple stoneware forms ornamented with Japanese-inspired designs. Within three years, Chaplet quietly succeeded in producing a true sang de boeuf glaze, first on stoneware and later on porcelain. He later took full control of the studio and continued production of the glazed stoneware that is still considered revolutionary. [Source: Jason Jacques]

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Ernest Chaplet, ‘Bloody Beautiful’, ca. 1890, Design/Decorative Art, Earthenware, Jason Jacques Gallery
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Jason Jacques Gallery
New York

Small in size but grand in concept, this three-tier vase is covered in a dripping sang de boeuf glaze with splashes of blue-green. The four looped handles that connect tiers two and three may be seen as references to architectural buttresses. In 1889, Chaplet won a gold medal at the Paris Universal Exposition for …

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Ernest Chaplet
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Ernest Chaplet began his career in 1848 as an apprentice at Sèvres, where he studied decoration, design and ceramics techniques. In 1882, after more than 30 years in the employ of large ceramics firms, he opened an atelier where, assisted by Albert-Louis Dammouse and funded by Haviland & Company, he created simple stoneware forms ornamented with Japanese-inspired designs. Within three years, Chaplet quietly succeeded in producing a true sang de boeuf glaze, first on stoneware and later on porcelain. He later took full control of the studio and continued production of the glazed stoneware that is still considered revolutionary. [Source: Jason Jacques]

Ernest Chaplet

Bloody Beautiful, ca. 1890

Earthenware
5 3/4 × 4 in
14.6 × 10.2 cm
Contact For Price
Location
New York
Have a question? Visit our help center.
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