Eva Hesse, ‘No title’, 1969-1970, Whitney Museum of American Art
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Eva Hesse

No title, 1969-1970

Latex, rope, string, and wire
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Sculpture
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© Estate of Eva Hesse; courtesy Hauser & Wirth
Eva Hesse
American, 1936–1970
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One of the first to work with synthetic materials like fiberglass, latex, and plastic, Eva Hesse is best-known for her innovative sculptures, dubbed Postminimalist for the time and style in which they were made. Reacting to the rigidity and uniformity of Minimalism, Hesse’s sculptural forms appear soft, slack, and uneven, conveying a human sensibility. A pioneering feminist artist, Hesse desired, in her own words, to “challenge the norms of beauty and order.” Hesse’s painful childhood—having fled Nazi Germany followed by her mother's suicide—significantly impacted her artmaking, prompting close friend and art historian Lucy Lippard to describe Hesse’s work as a “materialization of her anxieties.” Hesse’s artistic engagement with her own psychology is apparent in her Spectre paintings, where she uses muted tones and a thick and gestural application of paint to create haunting pictures reminiscent of Munch.

Eva Hesse, ‘No title’, 1969-1970, Whitney Museum of American Art
Save
Save
Share
Share
About the work
Articles
Exhibition history
Provenance
Medium
Sculpture
Image rights
© Estate of Eva Hesse; courtesy Hauser & Wirth
Eva Hesse
American, 1936–1970
Follow

One of the first to work with synthetic materials like fiberglass, latex, and plastic, Eva Hesse is best-known for her innovative sculptures, dubbed Postminimalist for the time and style in which they were made. Reacting to the rigidity and uniformity of Minimalism, Hesse’s sculptural forms appear soft, slack, and uneven, conveying a human sensibility. A pioneering feminist artist, Hesse desired, in her own words, to “challenge the norms of beauty and order.” Hesse’s painful childhood—having fled Nazi Germany followed by her mother's suicide—significantly impacted her artmaking, prompting close friend and art historian Lucy Lippard to describe Hesse’s work as a “materialization of her anxieties.” Hesse’s artistic engagement with her own psychology is apparent in her Spectre paintings, where she uses muted tones and a thick and gestural application of paint to create haunting pictures reminiscent of Munch.

Eva Hesse

No title, 1969-1970

Latex, rope, string, and wire
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
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