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Fabio Mauri, ‘I numeri malefici (Installation view)’, 1978, 56th Venice Biennale
Fabio Mauri, ‘I numeri malefici (Installation view)’, 1978, 56th Venice Biennale
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Fabio Mauri

I numeri malefici (Installation view), 1978

Installation with blackboard, photographs, iron cages, sound system, lithograph by Giorgio De Chirico
Location
Venice
About the work
Exhibition history
Medium
Installation
Image rights
Photo by Alex John Beck for Artsy.
Fabio Mauri
Italian, 1926–2009
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Fabio Mauri became one of the best-known post-war Italian artists for his exploration of many mediums, particularly his film and performance works. Mauri began his career making gestural paintings and drawings, but these fell to the wayside as Mauri’s interest in moving images grew. He became most fascinated with film, drawing from both personal and documentary materials. The projected image onto a surface became a central motif and a device for bridging several moments in time. Beginning in the 1950s, Mauri created a series for which he is now best known, comprised of “Schermi” (or “Screens”). As he described, “even before starting a movie, the screen was for me a sort of absorbent paper. It would give us a reality that had already been judged.”

Fabio Mauri, ‘I numeri malefici (Installation view)’, 1978, 56th Venice Biennale
Fabio Mauri, ‘I numeri malefici (Installation view)’, 1978, 56th Venice Biennale
Save
Save
Share
Share
Save
Save
Share
Share
About the work
Exhibition history
Medium
Installation
Image rights
Photo by Alex John Beck for Artsy.
Fabio Mauri
Italian, 1926–2009
Follow

Fabio Mauri became one of the best-known post-war Italian artists for his exploration of many mediums, particularly his film and performance works. Mauri began his career making gestural paintings and drawings, but these fell to the wayside as Mauri’s interest in moving images grew. He became most fascinated with film, drawing from both personal and documentary materials. The projected image onto a surface became a central motif and a device for bridging several moments in time. Beginning in the 1950s, Mauri created a series for which he is now best known, comprised of “Schermi” (or “Screens”). As he described, “even before starting a movie, the screen was for me a sort of absorbent paper. It would give us a reality that had already been judged.”

Fabio Mauri

I numeri malefici (Installation view), 1978

Installation with blackboard, photographs, iron cages, sound system, lithograph by Giorgio De Chirico
Location
Venice
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