Fernand Léger, ‘Exhibition Poster, Museum Morsbroich-Leverkusen’, 1955, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Fernand Léger, ‘Exhibition Poster, Museum Morsbroich-Leverkusen’, 1955, VINCE fine arts/ephemera

1955 Exhibition Poster, Museum Morsbroich-Leverkusen,
Lithograph, Published by Mourlot Paris.
Condition:
Excellent- Minor surface dirt with extremely vivid colors.

Signature: Not Signed

Private Collection, NY

About Fernand Léger

Working in Paris during the height of Cubism, Fernand Léger’s iconic style, with its emphasis on primary colors and rounded, massive forms, has become informally regarded as “Tubism.” Even at their most abstract, Léger’s subjects are easier to recognize than the rigorous Cubist dissections of Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, and the accessibility and contemporary subject matter of his works have led many to describe Léger as both populist and a forerunner of Pop Art. Interested in modern innovation, Léger joined the Puteaux Cubists, engaging with Robert Delaunay, Francis Picabia, and Jean Metzinger, among others. His interest in industry and machines was further encouraged by the Italian Futurist painters, and by his military service for France during World War I. While Léger would later revisit more traditional subjects—including the female nude, landscape and still life—these works retained his characteristically bold style.

French, 1881-1955, Argentan, France, based in Paris, France

About Pablo Picasso

A prolific and tireless innovator of art forms, Pablo Picasso impacted the course of 20th-century art with unparalleled magnitude. Inspired by African and Iberian art and developments in the world around him, Picasso contributed significantly to a number of artistic movements, notably Cubism, Surrealism, Neoclassicism, and Expressionism. Along with Georges Braque, Picasso is best known for pioneering Cubism in an attempt to reconcile three-dimensional space with the two-dimensional picture plane, once asking, “Are we to paint what’s on the face, what’s inside the face, or what’s behind it?” Responding to the Spanish Civil War, he painted his most famous work, Guernica (1937), whose violent images of anguished figures rendered in grisaille made it a definitive work of anti-war art. “Painting is not made to decorate apartments,” he said. “It’s an offensive and defensive weapon against the enemy.” Picasso’s sizable oeuvre includes over 20,000 paintings, prints, drawings, sculptures, ceramics, theater sets, and costume designs.

Spanish, 1881-1973, Malaga, Spain, based in Paris and Mougins, France