Fernando Bryce, ‘Hawaii’, 2002, Christine König Galerie
Fernando Bryce, ‘Hawaii’, 2002, Christine König Galerie
Fernando Bryce, ‘Hawaii’, 2002, Christine König Galerie
Fernando Bryce, ‘Hawaii’, 2002, Christine König Galerie
Fernando Bryce, ‘Hawaii’, 2002, Christine König Galerie
Fernando Bryce, ‘Hawaii’, 2002, Christine König Galerie
Fernando Bryce, ‘Hawaii’, 2002, Christine König Galerie
Fernando Bryce, ‘Hawaii’, 2002, Christine König Galerie
Fernando Bryce, ‘Hawaii’, 2002, Christine König Galerie
Fernando Bryce, ‘Hawaii’, 2002, Christine König Galerie
Fernando Bryce, ‘Hawaii’, 2002, Christine König Galerie
Fernando Bryce, ‘Hawaii’, 2002, Christine König Galerie

When I met Fernando Bryce in Berlin in I994 he was working on his first series of images which combined various drawing styles and derived from Peruvian as well as German imagery. He had placed a perspex!sign with the inscription “Museo Hawaii” casually in his studio. It seamed to me to be an all encompassing title to Fernando Bryce‘s work. He then told me the following story: Whilst strolling through the city of Lima he once came!across a hand-painted wooden sign which pointed towards a “Museo Hawaii” Following its direction Fernando found a backyard installation of the strangest eclectic display of objects in glass vitrines, attempting to give an!explanation of world history which most likely only the creator of this collection could comprehend. Fascinated and excited about his discovery, Fernando Bryce wanted to revisit the place the next day and show it to a friend. When!he found the yard that he had memorized the museum had vanished.It had followed its secret itinerary and remained untraceable. For Fernando, this was probably the founding moment for his own “Museo Hawaii” - the beginning!of his image archive which now consists of news fragments, documentary photographs, brochures,illustrations and texts.
In the last few years he has produced a considerable body of work made out of drawing series. Some have autobiographical references such as “Sublim, Chocolate de Mani”, others deal with the scope for visual analysis that is at an!artist's disposal when he lives and works in such extremely diverse places as Lima and Berlin.!
The underlying principle of Fernando Bryce’s artistic strategy is what he calls “mimetic analysis”. In transferring the images of his choice into ink drawings, he homogenizes the image. In doing so he opens up the possibilities for a!new reading. He reveals hidden meanings and facilitates new interpretations; visual strategies become apparent, colonial viewpoints reveal themselves. The gaze towards the exotic is reflected back upon
the viewer who is trapped!in his own clichés. In all of this though, Fernando Bryce never takes on the attitude of a lecturer, but shows an amused irony paired with the analytical sharpness of a contemporary who strolls not only through the cities, but also!through our media image world.

About Fernando Bryce