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Courtesy National Gallery of Art, Washington

The tempestuous works of Francisco de Goya distinguish him as the most important Spanish painter of his time. Among his contemporaries, he was best known for his lighthearted tapestry cartoons of leisure activities, subtle satirical etchings of the bourgeoisie, and penetratingly psychological portraits of the aristocracy. Having survived an unknown illness that left him deaf and witnessed the atrocities committed during Napoleon’s occupation, which are hauntingly portrayed in the mass execution of Spanish civilians in The Third of May 1808, Goya went on to create some of his most somber, chilling images with his late “Black Paintings,” which were painted directly onto the walls of his home. Now recognized as a harbinger of modern art, Goya influenced numerous artists, including Pablo Picasso in the creation of his masterpiece Guernica (1937).

Collected by major museums
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, J. Paul Getty Museum, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum , The National Arts Club, Cleveland Museum of Art
Selected exhibitions
2018
Song of Myself: Self-PortraitsThe National Arts Club
2016
Goya: Mad ReasonBlanton Museum of Art
2015
Goya: The PortraitsThe National Gallery, London
View all

Disparate ridiculo (Ridiculous Folly), in or after 1816

Etching, aquatint and drypoint [trial proof printed posthumously circa 1854-1863]
Permanent collection
Location
Washington
Medium
Image rights
Courtesy National Gallery of Art, Washington

The tempestuous works of Francisco de Goya distinguish him as the most important Spanish painter of his time. Among his contemporaries, he was best known for his lighthearted tapestry cartoons of leisure activities, subtle satirical etchings of the bourgeoisie, and penetratingly psychological portraits of the aristocracy. Having survived an unknown illness that left him deaf and witnessed the atrocities committed during Napoleon’s occupation, which are hauntingly portrayed in the mass execution of Spanish civilians in The Third of May 1808, Goya went on to create some of his most somber, chilling images with his late “Black Paintings,” which were painted directly onto the walls of his home. Now recognized as a harbinger of modern art, Goya influenced numerous artists, including Pablo Picasso in the creation of his masterpiece Guernica (1937).

Collected by major museums
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, J. Paul Getty Museum, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum , The National Arts Club, Cleveland Museum of Art
Selected exhibitions (3)
Other works by Francisco de Goya
Related works