Frank Lloyd Wright, ‘Avery Coonley Playhouse: Triptych Window’, 1912, Art Institute of Chicago
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Avery Coonley Playhouse: Triptych Window, 1912

Clear and colored lead glass in oak frames
36 × 58 1/2 in
91.4 × 148.6 cm
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About the work
Art Institute of Chicago
Chicago

Restricted gift of Dr. and Mrs. Edwin J. DeCosta and the Walter E. Heller Foundation

Medium
Architecture
Image rights
© 2014 Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Frank Lloyd Wright
American, 1867–1959
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During his 70-year career, American architect Frank Lloyd Wright championed a personal belief that architecture should address the physical, social, and spiritual needs of the inhabitant while remaining in harmony with the landscape. Wright, who punctuated nature with a capital “N”, placed great importance on the unity of man and nature and strived to compose environments where the architecture and land formed a unified whole, as in Fallingwater (1935), the house he built atop a waterfall. Throughout his career, Wright continually embraced the social and technological advancements of the 20th century and successfully aligned new opportunities with his values. In 1991, the American Institute of Architects named Wright “the greatest American architect of all time,” and in the same year, his Fallingwater home was voted “the best all time work of American architecture.”

Frank Lloyd Wright, ‘Avery Coonley Playhouse: Triptych Window’, 1912, Art Institute of Chicago
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
About the work
Art Institute of Chicago
Chicago

Restricted gift of Dr. and Mrs. Edwin J. DeCosta and the Walter E. Heller Foundation

Medium
Architecture
Image rights
© 2014 Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Frank Lloyd Wright
American, 1867–1959
Follow

During his 70-year career, American architect Frank Lloyd Wright championed a personal belief that architecture should address the physical, social, and spiritual needs of the inhabitant while remaining in harmony with the landscape. Wright, who punctuated nature with a capital “N”, placed great importance on the unity of man and nature and strived to compose environments where the architecture and land formed a unified whole, as in Fallingwater (1935), the house he built atop a waterfall. Throughout his career, Wright continually embraced the social and technological advancements of the 20th century and successfully aligned new opportunities with his values. In 1991, the American Institute of Architects named Wright “the greatest American architect of all time,” and in the same year, his Fallingwater home was voted “the best all time work of American architecture.”

Avery Coonley Playhouse: Triptych Window, 1912

Clear and colored lead glass in oak frames
36 × 58 1/2 in
91.4 × 148.6 cm
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
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