Frank Stella, ‘The Affidavit ’, 1993, Alpha 137 Gallery
Frank Stella, ‘The Affidavit ’, 1993, Alpha 137 Gallery
Frank Stella, ‘The Affidavit ’, 1993, Alpha 137 Gallery
Frank Stella, ‘The Affidavit ’, 1993, Alpha 137 Gallery

"The Affidavit" - a stunning mixed media relief masterpiece with uneven deckled edges, was inspired by Herman Melville's legendary novel "Moby Dick". It was created in 41 colors in 16 different runs in a small edition of 38 by Tyler Graphics, on handmade paper with deckled, uneven edges. The work is signed, numbered and dated 1993 by Frank Stella, with the Tyler Graphics Ltd. chop mark placed next to the signature, and the workshop identification number on the verso of the print. It is framed in an elegant blond wood museum frame with plexiglass, bearing a Jaffe Baker Blau Gallery label on the verso and the original $15,000 price from 1993 -- nearly a quarter century ago! "The Affidavit" is named after chapter 45 - one of the most significant chapters in Herman Melville's novel "Moby Dick" - and this Stella work is one of the most desirable works from this iconic series. In excellent condition; ready to hang in museum frame; the buyer of this work will be delighted.
Publisher: Tyler Graphics, Ltd. Mt. Kisco, New York
Catalogue Raisonne Refereence: Axsom, 64
Measurements Unframed: 61.25 x 45.5
Measurements Framed: 69.25"h, 52.5"

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Signature: This work - one of the most important of the series - is signed, numbered and dated 1993 by Frank Stella, with the Tyler Graphics Ltd. chop mark placed next to the signature, and the workshop identification number on the verso of the piece. The work is framed with a custom built museum frame, with the original gallery label on the back.

Frank Stella, Moby Dick Deckle Edges, Jacqueline Baas (Scholarly Essay), 1993 - writes extensively on the contents and symbolism of "The Affidavit" in the context of Stella's iconic Moby Dick Deckle Edges series
Catalogue Raisonne Refereence: Axsom, 64

Jaffe Baker Blau Gallery (with label)

About Frank Stella

Frank Stella, an iconic figure of postwar American art, is considered the most influential painter of a generation that moved beyond Abstract Expressionism toward Minimalism. In his early work, Stella attempted to drain any external meaning or symbolism from painting, reducing his images to geometric form and eliminating illusionistic effects. His goal was to make paintings in which pictorial force came from materiality, not from symbolic meaning. He famously quipped, “What you see is what you see,” a statement that became the unofficial credo of Minimalist practice. In the 1980s and '90s, Stella turned away from Minimalism, adopting a more additive approach for a series of twisting, monumental, polychromatic metal wall reliefs and sculptures based on Herman Melville’s Moby Dick.

American, b. 1936, Malden, Massachusetts, based in New York and Rock Tavern, New York