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Frida Kahlo, ‘(4) Magazines- 1931 Vanity Fair, 1936 Vogue, 1937 Vogue, 2012 Mexican Vogue’, 1931-1938, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
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(4) Magazines- 1931 Vanity Fair, 1936 Vogue, 1937 Vogue, 2012 Mexican Vogue, 1931-1938

Magazine
12 × 10 in
30.5 × 25.4 cm
This is ephemera, an artifact related to the artist.
$5,000
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Have a question? Visit our help center.
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About the work
Provenance
VINCE fine arts/ephemera
  • 1931 VANITY FAIR US Magazine FK first introduction as
    Mrs. Diego Rivera wife of famous Mexican …
Medium
Print
Signature
No, not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Vanity Fair, Vogue
Frida Kahlo
Mexican, 1907–1954
Follow

Frida Kahlo’s life has become as iconic as her work, in no small part because she was her own most popular subject: roughly one third of her entire oeuvre is self-portraits. Her works were intensely personal and political, often reflecting her turbulent personal life, her illness, and her relationship with the revolutionary muralist Diego Rivera. Kahlo dedicated her life and her art to the Mexican Revolution and the simultaneous artistic renaissance it engendered. Her style of painting has been widely categorized; Rivera considered her a realist, while André Breton considered her a Surrealist, and Kahlo eschewed labels entirely. “I paint my own reality,” she wrote. “The only thing I know is that I paint because I need to, and I paint whatever passes through my head without any other consideration.” She identified most strongly with Mexican popular and folk art, also evidenced in her habit of dressing elaborately in Tehuana costumes.

Diego Rivera
Mexican, 1886–1957
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Inspired by Renaissance frescoes and motivated by a conviction in the value of public art, Diego Rivera found his calling as a muralist. A visit to the Soviet Union informed his signature earth-toned, Social Realist style. In accordance with his Marxist views, he “made the masses the heroes of monumental art,” painting narrative scenes championing indigenous Mexican culture and workers who toiled in the name of progress. Detroit Industry (1932-3), a 27-panel tribute to the city’s labor force, reveals Rivera’s interest in the form and function of industrial technology. While his concern for the working class resonated in the United States, his inclusion of a portrait of Lenin in Man at the Crossroads (1933), a mural commissioned for Rockefeller Center in New York City, proved highly controversial.

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Frida Kahlo, ‘(4) Magazines- 1931 Vanity Fair, 1936 Vogue, 1937 Vogue, 2012 Mexican Vogue’, 1931-1938, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Navigate right
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
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About the work
Provenance
VINCE fine arts/ephemera
  • 1931 VANITY FAIR US Magazine FK first introduction as
    Mrs. Diego Rivera wife of famous Mexican artist.
  • 1937 VOGUE US Magazine, "Senoras of Mexico"
  • 1938 VOGUE US Magazine, Introduction of FK as artist.
    -2012 VOGUE Special Edition (Mexico)
Medium
Print
Signature
No, not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Vanity Fair, Vogue
Frida Kahlo
Mexican, 1907–1954
Follow

Frida Kahlo’s life has become as iconic as her work, in no small part because she was her own most popular subject: roughly one third of her entire oeuvre is self-portraits. Her works were intensely personal and political, often reflecting her turbulent personal life, her illness, and her relationship with the revolutionary muralist Diego Rivera. Kahlo dedicated her life and her art to the Mexican Revolution and the simultaneous artistic renaissance it engendered. Her style of painting has been widely categorized; Rivera considered her a realist, while André Breton considered her a Surrealist, and Kahlo eschewed labels entirely. “I paint my own reality,” she wrote. “The only thing I know is that I paint because I need to, and I paint whatever passes through my head without any other consideration.” She identified most strongly with Mexican popular and folk art, also evidenced in her habit of dressing elaborately in Tehuana costumes.

Diego Rivera
Mexican, 1886–1957
Follow

Inspired by Renaissance frescoes and motivated by a conviction in the value of public art, Diego Rivera found his calling as a muralist. A visit to the Soviet Union informed his signature earth-toned, Social Realist style. In accordance with his Marxist views, he “made the masses the heroes of monumental art,” painting narrative scenes championing indigenous Mexican culture and workers who toiled in the name of progress. Detroit Industry (1932-3), a 27-panel tribute to the city’s labor force, reveals Rivera’s interest in the form and function of industrial technology. While his concern for the working class resonated in the United States, his inclusion of a portrait of Lenin in Man at the Crossroads (1933), a mural commissioned for Rockefeller Center in New York City, proved highly controversial.

(4) Magazines- 1931 Vanity Fair, 1936 Vogue, 1937 Vogue, 2012 Mexican Vogue, 1931-1938

Magazine
12 × 10 in
30.5 × 25.4 cm
This is ephemera, an artifact related to the artist.
$5,000
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Have a question? Visit our help center.
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
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