Friedensreich Hundertwasser, ‘The Eyes of Machu Picchu’, 1960-1969, Lions Gallery
Friedensreich Hundertwasser, ‘The Eyes of Machu Picchu’, 1960-1969, Lions Gallery
Friedensreich Hundertwasser, ‘The Eyes of Machu Picchu’, 1960-1969, Lions Gallery
Friedensreich Hundertwasser, ‘The Eyes of Machu Picchu’, 1960-1969, Lions Gallery
Friedensreich Hundertwasser, ‘The Eyes of Machu Picchu’, 1960-1969, Lions Gallery
Friedensreich Hundertwasser, ‘The Eyes of Machu Picchu’, 1960-1969, Lions Gallery
Friedensreich Hundertwasser, ‘The Eyes of Machu Picchu’, 1960-1969, Lions Gallery

very large, framed woodcut or silkscreen on linoleum. it appears to be signed in the plate and then notated by hand ... Uganda... it is not framed and will be shipped rolled in a tube.

Friedensreich Fritz Hundertwasser was born in Vienna in 1928 as Friedrich
Stowasser. He initially gained acclaim for his paintings, but is currently
more renowned for his unique architectural stylings. His revolutionary
ecological stands with regard to architecture have earned him the nickname
"Architecture­Healer." His works have been used for flags and stamps, coins
and posters, schools and churches.
The gallery Peithner­Lichtenfels showed his work. Artists present at the
opening exhibition included Adolf Frohner, Friedensreich Hundertwasser,
Jürgen Messensee and Hans Staudacher. Jürgen Messensees work was just
starting to be shown around this time and the first picture we sold was a
Messensee.
Artists shown in the apartment­gallery included the likes of Kurt Absolon,
Wander Bertoni, Josef Dobrowsky, Gustav Hessing, Alfred Hrdlicka, Heinrich
Jungnickel, Karl Korab, Kurt Moldovan, Sergius Pauser, Josef Pillhofer,
Arnulf Rainer, Fritz Wotruba and Franz von Zülow.
The Vienna school was represented by Arik Brauer, Ernst Fuchs and Anton
Lehmden and later Rudolf Hausner.
In 1963 the gallery moved into Seilergasse in the first district of Vienna.
The new space opened with Karl Korabs first solo show. During this time a
close partnership developed with the Aoki Gallery in Tokyo
Other artists who exhibited in the gallery at this time included Hubert
Aratym, Bele Bachem, Salvador Dali, Josef Dobrowsky, Greta Freist, Ernst
Fuchs, Albert Paris Gütersloh, David Hamilton, Rudolf Hausner, Wolfgang
Herzig, Fritz von Herzmanovsky­Orlando, Alfred Hrdlicka, Heinrich
Jungnickel, Oskar Kokoschka, Alfred Kubin, Anton Lehmden, Piet Mondrian,
Karl Plattner, Friedrich SchröderSonnenstern, Erhard Stöbe, Ferdinand
Stransky and Robert Zeppel­Sperl. Numerous exhibitions of Hundertwasser's paintings have been mounted,
including one ­man shows at the Art Club, Vienna (1952); Studio Paul
Facchetti, Paris (1954, 1960, 1965, and 1974); Tokyo Gallery (1961);
Austrian Pavilion, Binnale, Venice (1962); Kestner­Gesellschaft, Hannover
(1966); University of California, Berkeley (1968); Auckland City Art
Gallery, New Zealand (1973); and a retrospective at the Haus der Kunst,
Munich (1975). In 1957 Hundertwasser was awarded the Prix du Syndicat
d'Initiative, Première Bordeaux (France) Biennale, and in 1959 the Sanbra
Prize at the Fifth São Paulo (Brazil) Biennale. That same year he assumed a
guest lectureship in Hamburg at the Kunsthochschule der Freien und
Hansestadt, only to be asked to leave his post because he performed the
"endless line," a ten mile, two days and nights spiral. He was also awarded
the Mainichi Prize at the Sixth International Art Exhibition, Tokyo, in
1961.
The artist's public lectures and manifestations include: "Art Is Always
Changing" (Salzburg, 1949); "My Aspiration: To Free Myself from the
Universal Bluff of our Civilization" (Vienna, 1952); "Mouldiness Manifesto:
Against Rationalism in Architecture" (Austria and Germany, 1958); "Les
Ortilles" (Paris, 1959); "Naked Speech" (Munich, 1968); "Intensive Naked
Demonstration" (Vienna, 1968); and "Your right to windows ­ your duty to
the trees" (1972).

He remains sui generis, although his architectural work is comparable to
Antoni Gaudí in its biomorphic forms and use of tile. He was inspired by
the works of Egon Schiele from an early date, and his style was often
compared to that of Gustav Klimt. He was fascinated with spirals, and
called straight lines "the devil's tools". He called his theory of art
"transautomatism", based on Surrealist automatism, but focusing on the
experience of the viewer, rather than the artist.

Condition: Good

About Friedensreich Hundertwasser