Gary Hume, ‘Capital’, 2011, Joanna Bryant & Julian Page

Only available as part of the complete framed set of 12 Official Prints from the London Olympic and Paralympic Games 2012: Anthea Hamilton - Divers, Martin Creed - Work No. 1273, Howard Hodgkin – Swimming, Bridget Riley – Rose Rose, Chris Ofili - For the Unknown Runner, Rachel Whiteread – LOndOn 2O12, Fiona Banner - Superhuman Nude, Michael Craig-Martin – GO, Tracey Emin - Birds 2012, Gary Hume – Capital, Sarah Morris - Big Ben 2012, Bob and Roberta Smith - LOVE.

13 colour screen print on 400 Velin Arches paper.
Gary Hume creates paintings with distinctive colour palettes, reduced imagery, and rich surfaces. Hume has abstracted elements from an image of a wheelchair-tennis player, combining them with foliage and a soft and subtle colour palette. The large, circular form represents the wheel of the wheelchair and the black tennis ball hangs suspended in space, the tennis racquet poised to smash the ball across the net. The large circular form can also be seen as a mouth cheering from the audience. Hume has created an aspirational image celebrating summer sport in London.

Since 1912, each Olympic Host City has commissioned one or more posters to celebrate the hosting of the Games. The official posters of the Games are now themselves a unique celebration of 100 years of the meeting of art and sport, and a body of iconic work has been created over the last century. For London 2012, a commissioning panel including Tate Director Sir Nicholas Serota invited 12 leading artists to create images, using the Olympic and Paralympic values or the city of London as inspiration. Each resulting artwork is a distinct interpretation of either the Olympic or Paralympic Games.

About Gary Hume

Young British Artist Gary Hume came to prominence in the early 1990s with his “Door” paintings, a series of life-sized paintings of hospital doors. These minimal, abstract compositions eventually evolved into more fluid, lyrical imagery, often employing found images of celebrities (including Michael Jackson) and animals. In his 2009 paintings of American cheerleaders, entitled “American Tan,” Hume explored dualities of desire and repulsion, sexuality and innocence. Exuberantly embracing kitsch, Hume straddles the line between representation and abstraction, painting with high-gloss paints on aluminum panels to create vibrant color contrasts and a flat, Pop-inflected aesthetic.

English, b. 1962, Tenterden, United Kingdom