Medium
Signature
Signed: lower right below impression, titled & numbered lower left, below impression
Series
Edition 5 of 50, listed in catalogue raisonne vol. II, pg 90

After discovering the small town of Taos, New Mexico on her honeymoon in 1945, printmaker Gene Kloss embarked on a career-defining endeavor to document the landscape and people of this Western region. Though originally commuting back and forth from Berkeley, California (and setting up temporary print studios on concrete near her campsite), Kloss and her husband eventually became permanent residents of Taos in 1945, where they worked among a colony of artists. Though occasionally using watercolor or oil, Kloss was best known for her use of printmaking to document the landscape and lives within New Mexican Pueblos. Kloss devised a new method of etching that involved painting acid directly on top of her etching plate, resulting in a unique quality of her prints, stylized by high-contrast, sharp lines, and smooth color gradients.

Selected exhibitions
2020
Edward T. Pollack Fine Arts at IFPDA Fine Art Print Fair Online Spring 2020Edward T. Pollack Fine Arts
Keith Sheridan, LLC at IFPDA Fine Art Print Fair Online Fall 2020Keith Sheridan, LLC
2018
Artistic Encounters with Indigenous AmericaThe Metropolitan Museum of Art
View all

Gunnison River Cliffs, 1967

Etching on paper
12 × 18 in
30.5 × 45.7 cm
Edition 5/50
.
$3,000
Location
Santa Fe
Have a question? Visit our help center.
Medium
Signature
Signed: lower right below impression, titled & numbered lower left, below impression
Series
Edition 5 of 50, listed in catalogue raisonne vol. II, pg 90

After discovering the small town of Taos, New Mexico on her honeymoon in 1945, printmaker Gene Kloss embarked on a career-defining endeavor to document the landscape and people of this Western region. Though originally commuting back and forth from Berkeley, California (and setting up temporary print studios on concrete near her campsite), Kloss and her husband eventually became permanent residents of Taos in 1945, where they worked among a colony of artists. Though occasionally using watercolor or oil, Kloss was best known for her use of printmaking to document the landscape and lives within New Mexican Pueblos. Kloss devised a new method of etching that involved painting acid directly on top of her etching plate, resulting in a unique quality of her prints, stylized by high-contrast, sharp lines, and smooth color gradients.

Selected exhibitions (3)
Other works by Gene Kloss
Other works from Addison Rowe Gallery