George Condo, ‘Opus 1.  Condo's title, Opus 1, references this as being his first-ever foray into creating fashion- while his signature and iconic gold head foiled onto the piece make for an exceptional entree.’, ART CAPSUL
George Condo, ‘Opus 1.  Condo's title, Opus 1, references this as being his first-ever foray into creating fashion- while his signature and iconic gold head foiled onto the piece make for an exceptional entree.’, ART CAPSUL
George Condo, ‘Opus 1.  Condo's title, Opus 1, references this as being his first-ever foray into creating fashion- while his signature and iconic gold head foiled onto the piece make for an exceptional entree.’, ART CAPSUL
George Condo, ‘Opus 1.  Condo's title, Opus 1, references this as being his first-ever foray into creating fashion- while his signature and iconic gold head foiled onto the piece make for an exceptional entree.’, ART CAPSUL
George Condo, ‘Opus 1.  Condo's title, Opus 1, references this as being his first-ever foray into creating fashion- while his signature and iconic gold head foiled onto the piece make for an exceptional entree.’, ART CAPSUL
George Condo, ‘Opus 1.  Condo's title, Opus 1, references this as being his first-ever foray into creating fashion- while his signature and iconic gold head foiled onto the piece make for an exceptional entree.’, ART CAPSUL

Drawing specific information from his "Nannies" series, Condo's reference in this iteration mutates as a Swiss chalet nanny. Fron the reverse, one can imagine the urban vernacular of a parka jacket, while the front of the garment juxtaposes the semi transparent silk chiffon baby dress- trimmed in real fox fur- revealing itself as a sexy cocktail dress. To top it off, the designated placement of the head from one of Condo's paintings, silkscreened with gold foil detail, comically suggests the effect of having sat on his work. As a painter, Condo's use of gold-plated staples in his garment are a nod to the industrial staples used to stretch canvases to their frames.

While George Condo's artwork typically draws on traditional classics such as Manet, Velazquez, Picasso, Goya and Raphael, his garment utilizes classical materials and notions of luxury such as fur and 24-karat gold, juxtaposed against contemporary themes such as the parka jacket and babydoll dress- with the final effect bearing the signature High/Low combination of fine art and street culture that regularly inform his vocabulary. His talent for combining disparate references in a way that reinvents their varied basis is not limited to the canvas, as is evident with this highly inventive garment.

About George Condo

George Condo’s work is populated by a cast of characters whose bulging eyes, bulbous cheeks, proliferating limbs, and hideous over- and under-bites set them apart as a singular species. Drawing on vastly diverse painting practices—like Pablo Picasso, Diego Velázquez, Henri Matisse, and Cy Twombly—Condo absorbs a vast range of art-historical sources, yet, at the same, creates a pictorial language characteristically his own, one that investigates the macabre, the carnivalesque, and the abject. He calls his surrealistic style “psychological cubism”, exploiting “our own imperfections—the private, off-moments or unseen aspects of humanity—that often give way to some of painting’s most beautiful moments.” Even Condo’s most abstract works, like Internal Space (2005) with its impenetrable geometric scaffolding of forms radiating from the painting’s center, explore the furthest extremes of the human psyche.

American, b. 1957, Concord, New Hampshire, based in New York, New York