George Nakashima, ‘Conoid Bench, Bench’, 1974, PIASA
Save
Save
Share
Share

George Nakashima

Conoid Bench, Bench, 1974

Noyer américain et palissandre des Indes
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
About the work
P
PIASA

H 76×L 285×P 84 cm - Pièce unique

Provenance : Mrs. Ellen Hartman, Brookside, New Jersey

Medium
George Nakashima
American, 1905–1990
Follow

In the workshop of George Nakashima, the soul of the tree was celebrated. "It is an art- and soul-satisfying adventure to walk the forests of the world, to commune with trees,” Nakashima said, “to bring this living material to the work bench, ultimately to give it a second life." Nakashima, an architect who trained at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, discovered woodworking while in an internment camp during WWII. In 1943, he moved to New Hope, Pennsylvania and opened his studio. There he created pieces highlighting wood’s natural beauty, most notably by including the tree’s rough outer layer, or the “free edge”. Nakashima worked throughout the world; in India, he became deeply spiritual. He developed a goal to construct peace altars on every continent—the first, made of book-matched slabs of black walnut, was installed at New York’s Cathedral of St. John the Divine in 1986.

Navigate left
George Nakashima, ‘Conoid Bench, Bench’, 1974, PIASA
Navigate right
Save
Save
Share
Share
About the work
P
PIASA

H 76×L 285×P 84 cm - Pièce unique

Provenance : Mrs. Ellen Hartman, Brookside, New Jersey

Bibliographie : Mira Nakashima, 'Nature Form & Spirit, The life and Legacy of George Nakashima', Ed. Abrams, New-York -2003 pp. 172-173

Buyer responsible for Buyer’s Premium and any applicable taxes, including VAT.

Medium
George Nakashima
American, 1905–1990
Follow

In the workshop of George Nakashima, the soul of the tree was celebrated. "It is an art- and soul-satisfying adventure to walk the forests of the world, to commune with trees,” Nakashima said, “to bring this living material to the work bench, ultimately to give it a second life." Nakashima, an architect who trained at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, discovered woodworking while in an internment camp during WWII. In 1943, he moved to New Hope, Pennsylvania and opened his studio. There he created pieces highlighting wood’s natural beauty, most notably by including the tree’s rough outer layer, or the “free edge”. Nakashima worked throughout the world; in India, he became deeply spiritual. He developed a goal to construct peace altars on every continent—the first, made of book-matched slabs of black walnut, was installed at New York’s Cathedral of St. John the Divine in 1986.

George Nakashima

Conoid Bench, Bench, 1974

Noyer américain et palissandre des Indes
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
Other works by George Nakashima
Related works
Most Similar