George Nakashima, ‘The Frosh Family Sanso "Reception House" Table and Set of Six Conoid Chairs, New Hope, Pennsylvania’, 1981, Freeman's
George Nakashima, ‘The Frosh Family Sanso "Reception House" Table and Set of Six Conoid Chairs, New Hope, Pennsylvania’, 1981, Freeman's
George Nakashima, ‘The Frosh Family Sanso "Reception House" Table and Set of Six Conoid Chairs, New Hope, Pennsylvania’, 1981, Freeman's
George Nakashima, ‘The Frosh Family Sanso "Reception House" Table and Set of Six Conoid Chairs, New Hope, Pennsylvania’, 1981, Freeman's
George Nakashima, ‘The Frosh Family Sanso "Reception House" Table and Set of Six Conoid Chairs, New Hope, Pennsylvania’, 1981, Freeman's
George Nakashima, ‘The Frosh Family Sanso "Reception House" Table and Set of Six Conoid Chairs, New Hope, Pennsylvania’, 1981, Freeman's

H: 28 x W: 60 x D: 84.5 in. (table)
H: 35.5 x W: 21 x D: 21 in. (chairs)

From the Catalogue
Built by George Nakashima for the family of Stanley Frosh, a prominent judge and close family friend, this impressive table is named for the Reception House (also known as the Sanso or Mountain Villa), the last building designed and built by George Nakashima on his New Hope, Pennsylvania compound from 1975-77. Today, the Sanso Villa showcases a number of Nakashima masterworks, including the earliest designed Sanso table, built for the space with two large bookmatched English walnut slabs. Nakashima's mastery is on full display in these monumental forms, highlighting the extraordinary crotch grain of the wood, cradled by a delicate support system. The Frosh table is likely one of the earliest of these Sanso forms, a design that was later adapted by George Nakashima for his even larger Altars for Peace. These Altars were meant to be placed on every continent, tables around which George envisioned people from all over the world coming together "for prayer, meditation and contemplation." George began the project in 1984 and it is continued today by Mira Nakashima and the George Nakashima Foundation for Peace.—Courtesy of Freeman's

This work is accompanied by a photocopy of the original invoice fron George Nakashima Woodworker. Freeman's would like to thank Mira Nakashima for her assistance in the cataloguing of this work.

Signature: The table signed with client's name and dated: "Frosh 1981", The chairs with single slab seats, each signed with client's name: "Frosh"

George Nakashima, The Soul of a Tree, pp. 38, 176-177 (for images and a discussion of the Sanso Villa)

Mira Nakashima, Nature Form and Spirit, pp. 224-229 (for images and a discussion of the Sanso Villa), pp. 236-242 (for images and a discussion of the Peace Altars)

Derek Ostergard, Full Circle, pp. 86-87 (for an image of discussion of the Peace Altars)

Property from an Important Family Collection, Washington, D.C.
Acquired directly from the artist
Thence by descent

About George Nakashima

In the workshop of George Nakashima, the soul of the tree was celebrated. "It is an art- and soul-satisfying adventure to walk the forests of the world, to commune with trees,” Nakashima said, “to bring this living material to the work bench, ultimately to give it a second life." Nakashima, an architect who trained at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, discovered woodworking while in an internment camp during WWII. In 1943, he moved to New Hope, Pennsylvania and opened his studio. There he created pieces highlighting wood’s natural beauty, most notably by including the tree’s rough outer layer, or the “free edge”. Nakashima worked throughout the world; in India, he became deeply spiritual. He developed a goal to construct peace altars on every continent—the first, made of book-matched slabs of black walnut, was installed at New York’s Cathedral of St. John the Divine in 1986.

American, 1905-1990, Spokane, Washington, based in New Hope, Pennsylvania

Solo Shows

2014
Johnson Trading Gallery, 
Woodside,

Group Shows

2016
WYETH, 
New York,
Evolution
View Artist's CV