George Segal, ‘Woman with Sunglasses on Bench’, 1983, Phillips
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George Segal

Woman with Sunglasses on Bench, 1983

Painted bronze on cast iron bench
Edition of 5 + 2AP
Bidding closed
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About the work
Provenance
P
Phillips

Property from the Miles and Shirley Fiterman Collection

Conceived in 1983, this work is from an …

Medium
George Segal
American, 1924–2000
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Whether portraying modern couples sitting in a park (Gay Liberation, 1980), or a biblical family’s unfolding drama (Abraham’s Farewell to Ishmael, 1987), George Segal’s life-size human figures express the fragility of the human condition. Hyperrealism, achieved by making full-body casts of live models using plaster bandages, renders the figures familiar and emotionally resonant. As such, Segal has been seen by some to have rejected the cool calculations of Pop art, despite being considered a prominent exponent of the movement for his casual depictions of contemporary culture and everyday situations. Yet, covered in bright primary colors or whitewash, Segal’s figures emanate an otherworldly strangeness, prompting New York Times critic Roberta Smith to describe them as “emotionally confounding.”

George Segal, ‘Woman with Sunglasses on Bench’, 1983, Phillips
Save
Save
Share
Share
About the work
Provenance
P
Phillips

Property from the Miles and Shirley Fiterman Collection

Conceived in 1983, this work is from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist's proofs.

figure 47 x 40 x 39 in. (119.4 x 101.6 x 99.1 cm.)
bench 31 3/4 x 71 7/8 x 22 in. (80.6 x 182.7 x 55.9 cm.)
overall 47 x 71 7/8 x 39 in. (119.4 x 182.7 x 99.1 cm.)

Guaranteed Property …

Medium
George Segal
American, 1924–2000
Follow

Whether portraying modern couples sitting in a park (Gay Liberation, 1980), or a biblical family’s unfolding drama (Abraham’s Farewell to Ishmael, 1987), George Segal’s life-size human figures express the fragility of the human condition. Hyperrealism, achieved by making full-body casts of live models using plaster bandages, renders the figures familiar and emotionally resonant. As such, Segal has been seen by some to have rejected the cool calculations of Pop art, despite being considered a prominent exponent of the movement for his casual depictions of contemporary culture and everyday situations. Yet, covered in bright primary colors or whitewash, Segal’s figures emanate an otherworldly strangeness, prompting New York Times critic Roberta Smith to describe them as “emotionally confounding.”

George Segal

Woman with Sunglasses on Bench, 1983

Painted bronze on cast iron bench
Edition of 5 + 2AP
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
Other works by George Segal