Georges Hoentschel, ‘Gourd’, ca. 1890, Jason Jacques Gallery
Georges Hoentschel, ‘Gourd’, ca. 1890, Jason Jacques Gallery
Georges Hoentschel, ‘Gourd’, ca. 1890, Jason Jacques Gallery
Georges Hoentschel, ‘Gourd’, ca. 1890, Jason Jacques Gallery
Georges Hoentschel, ‘Gourd’, ca. 1890, Jason Jacques Gallery
Georges Hoentschel, ‘Gourd’, ca. 1890, Jason Jacques Gallery

Leafy vegetation, supple curving forms and organic tones, lend this vessel a sense of having grown from the earth rather than having been hewn from it. This piece hints at new aesthetic experiments for Hoentschel, as it slightly departs from the Japanese-inspired and sculpturally-muted pottery Hoentschel had been commissioning in the 1890s, though speckled irregularities in the glaze, and indeed the freedom given to the glaze, harken back to that of the tea jars in Hoentschel’s own collection.

About Georges Hoentschel

Georges Hoentschel was an interior designer with an elite international following. He engaged sculptor Jean Carriès to create Japonist ceramics for his more advanced clients. Work done by Emile Grittel and others under Hoentschel's name was noted for gold glaze effects and the frequent use of metal mounts. Much of the inspiration was drawn from floral forms. Hoentschel's talent and taste were officially confirmed when he was commissioned to design and oversee the decoration of the pavilion of the Union Centrale des Arts Décoratifs at the Paris Universal Exhibition of 1900. [Source: Jason Jacques]

French, 1855-1915