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Lebendige Skulpturen | Gilbert & George, Konrad Lueg, Sigmar Polke, Gerhard Richter, 2018

11 1/5 × 9 3/10 × 1 1/5 in
28.5 × 23.5 × 3 cm
Contact For Price
Location
Düsseldorf
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About the work
Bibliography
Sies + Höke
Düsseldorf
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This catalogue will be published in October on the occasion of the exhibition "Lebendige …

Read more

This catalogue will be published in October on the occasion of the exhibition "Lebendige Skulpturen | Gilbert & George, Konrad Lueg, Sigmar Polke, Gerhard Richter", Sies + Höke, Düsseldorf

In the history of art, the title Living Sculpture is associated with the UK-based duo Gilbert & George. It …

Read more
Medium
Books and Portfolios
Publisher
Sies + Höke, Düsseldorf
Image rights
Courtesy Sies + Höke, Düsseldorf; Photographer Achim Kukulies, Düsseldorf
Gilbert and George
British, 1943 and 1942
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“Art for all” is the credo of Gilbert & George, who met in 1967 while students at St. Martin’s in London. Transcending the modernist tenets of Conceptual, Performance, and Process art, the duo gained critical acclaim for their legendary 1970 performance The Singing Sculpture, in which they established themselves as “living sculptures.” Since, the duo have been known for their cultivated public persona—they appear in public only together, wearing distinctive suits and insisting that their lives and their art are inseparable. Gilbert & George have expanded their practice over the past decades to a variety of media—books, film, painting, postcards, photomontages—their signature style drawing on a Pop sensibility and the appropriation of mass media images. Swinging between the whimsical and the obscene (one series depicted bodily fluids and sexual acts), Gilbert & George have explored a wide breadth of subjects pertaining to race, sexuality, religion, and mortality.

Konrad Lueg
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Sigmar Polke
German, 1941–2010
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Characterized by wit and endless inventiveness, Sigmar Polke created an oeuvre that is wildly diverse in its exploration of mediums and materials. Inspired by his fascination with science and alchemy, Polke innovated techniques in painting and photography by manipulating chemical processes. Life in post-war Germany led the artist to establish Capitalist Realism, an ironic exploration of consumerism using the imagery of popular culture and advertising, evident in his 1976 collage on paper Supermarkets aus dem Zyklus, Wir Kleinbürger (translated as “Supermarkets from the Cycle, We Petty Bourgeoisie”), featuring iconic Superman figures shopping in a brand-laden supermarket.

Gerhard Richter
German, b. 1932
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Gerhard Richter is known for a prolific and stylistically varied exploration of the medium of painting, often incorporating and exploring the visual effects of photography. “I like everything that has no style: dictionaries, photographs, nature, myself and my paintings,” he says. “Because style is violent, and I am not violent.” In the early 1960s, Richter began to create large-scale photorealist copies of black-and-white photographs rendered in a range of grays, and innovated a blurred effect (sometimes deemed “photographic impressionism”) in which portions of his compositions appear smeared or softened—paradoxically reproducing photographic effects and revealing his painterly hand. With heavily textured abstract gray monochromes, Richter introduced abstraction into his practice, and he has continued to move freely between figuration and abstraction, producing geometric “Colour Charts”, bold, gestural abstractions, and “Photo Paintings” of anything from nudes, flowers, and cars to landscapes, architecture, and scenes from Nazi history. Richter absorbed a range of influences, from Caspar David Friedrich and Roy Lichtenstein to Art Informel and Fluxus.

Navigate left
Navigate right
Save
Save
Share
Share
Save
Save
Share
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About the work
Bibliography
Sies + Höke
Düsseldorf
Follow

This catalogue will be published in October on the occasion of the exhibition "Lebendige …

Read more

This catalogue will be published in October on the occasion of the exhibition "Lebendige Skulpturen | Gilbert & George, Konrad Lueg, Sigmar Polke, Gerhard Richter", Sies + Höke, Düsseldorf

In the history of art, the title Living Sculpture is associated with the UK-based duo Gilbert & George. It …

Read more
Medium
Books and Portfolios
Publisher
Sies + Höke, Düsseldorf
Image rights
Courtesy Sies + Höke, Düsseldorf; Photographer Achim Kukulies, Düsseldorf
Gilbert and George
British, 1943 and 1942
Follow

“Art for all” is the credo of Gilbert & George, who met in 1967 while students at St. Martin’s in London. Transcending the modernist tenets of Conceptual, Performance, and Process art, the duo gained critical acclaim for their legendary 1970 performance The Singing Sculpture, in which they established themselves as “living sculptures.” Since, the duo have been known for their cultivated public persona—they appear in public only together, wearing distinctive suits and insisting that their lives and their art are inseparable. Gilbert & George have expanded their practice over the past decades to a variety of media—books, film, painting, postcards, photomontages—their signature style drawing on a Pop sensibility and the appropriation of mass media images. Swinging between the whimsical and the obscene (one series depicted bodily fluids and sexual acts), Gilbert & George have explored a wide breadth of subjects pertaining to race, sexuality, religion, and mortality.

Konrad Lueg
Follow
Sigmar Polke
German, 1941–2010
Follow

Characterized by wit and endless inventiveness, Sigmar Polke created an oeuvre that is wildly diverse in its exploration of mediums and materials. Inspired by his fascination with science and alchemy, Polke innovated techniques in painting and photography by manipulating chemical processes. Life in post-war Germany led the artist to establish Capitalist Realism, an ironic exploration of consumerism using the imagery of popular culture and advertising, evident in his 1976 collage on paper Supermarkets aus dem Zyklus, Wir Kleinbürger (translated as “Supermarkets from the Cycle, We Petty Bourgeoisie”), featuring iconic Superman figures shopping in a brand-laden supermarket.

Gerhard Richter
German, b. 1932
Follow

Gerhard Richter is known for a prolific and stylistically varied exploration of the medium of painting, often incorporating and exploring the visual effects of photography. “I like everything that has no style: dictionaries, photographs, nature, myself and my paintings,” he says. “Because style is violent, and I am not violent.” In the early 1960s, Richter began to create large-scale photorealist copies of black-and-white photographs rendered in a range of grays, and innovated a blurred effect (sometimes deemed “photographic impressionism”) in which portions of his compositions appear smeared or softened—paradoxically reproducing photographic effects and revealing his painterly hand. With heavily textured abstract gray monochromes, Richter introduced abstraction into his practice, and he has continued to move freely between figuration and abstraction, producing geometric “Colour Charts”, bold, gestural abstractions, and “Photo Paintings” of anything from nudes, flowers, and cars to landscapes, architecture, and scenes from Nazi history. Richter absorbed a range of influences, from Caspar David Friedrich and Roy Lichtenstein to Art Informel and Fluxus.

Lebendige Skulpturen | Gilbert & George, Konrad Lueg, Sigmar Polke, Gerhard Richter, 2018

11 1/5 × 9 3/10 × 1 1/5 in
28.5 × 23.5 × 3 cm
Contact For Price
Location
Düsseldorf
Have a question? Visit our help center.
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
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