[Finally down again (K. Wecker)]
[Finally down again (K. Wecker)]
[Finally down again (K. Wecker)]
[Finally down again (K. Wecker)]
[Finally down again (K. Wecker)]
[Finally down again (K. Wecker)]

Info-song : "Endlich wieder unten" Konstantin Wecker

This is a special Rip-off. There is just another one like this made with cassette tapes. For this work, Gregor didn't apply the cassette tapes on a specific part, but all over the canvas. So, what we normally call the "positive" becomes the "negative": a kind of black monochrome due to the postponement of the magnetic cassette tapes and the "negative" becomes the "positive": an almost white canvas with plastic poly-film cassette tapes. Here, the artist has used cassettes with primer colors that give rhythm to the canvas.

Ce Rip-off est particulier. Il n'en existe qu'un autre de ce type réalisé en bandes de cassettes vidéo. Dans le cas de cette pièce, Gregor n'applique pas les bandes de cassettes sur une partie choisie, mais sur toute la toile. Ce que nous appellons normalement "positif" devient le "négatif" : une sorte de monochrome noir dû au report de la matière magnétique des bandes de cassettes et le "négatif" devient le "positif" : une toile quasi blanche où ne reste que les pélicules plastiques de bandes de cassettes. Ici, l'artiste a utilisé des cassettes avec des amorces de couleurs qui viennent rythmer la toile.

About Gregor Hildebrandt

Conceptual, Berlin-based artist Gregor Hildebrandt transforms the near-obsolete relics of recording technology—like VHS, cassettes, and vinyl records—into sculptures, paintings, photographs and installations. To make his signature paintings, Hildebrandt applies tapes directly to the canvas, making impressions with them before finally adhering the cassettes themselves. He is also known to craft massive installations from these materials, including wall-sized “membranes” of extracted recording tape and galleries filled with old vinyl LPs that have been tackily remade into bowls. Though his formal vocabulary draws on minimalist and found-object traditions, Hildebrandt is just as interested in the references to pop culture and nostalgia embedded in the lost recordings. “I really love that there’s something inside the material that you can’t hear,” he says. “And when you see it, you only see black. You can have your own interpretation of the materials and it does something for your experience.”

German, b. 1974, Bad Homburg, Germany, based in Berlin, Germany

Exhibition Highlights On Artsy

2016
G2 #5: Hildebrand Collection, G2 Kunsthalle, Leipzig
2015
Spieglein, Spieglein an der Wand, Cultural Avenue, Wiesen
2015
Gregor Hildebrandt: Coming by Hazard, Galerie Perrotin, Hong Kong
2013