Gregor Hildebrandt, ‘Le vent est tombé (Santa Maria de Guadeloupe)’, 2016, Outset: Benefit Auction 2017

From the Catalogue:
Gregor Hildebrandt makes great use of pre-recorded cassette tapes as material in his pictures and installations. The tapes are applied directly onto canvases and photographic prints and in room-sized installations. Although Hildebrandt’s work makes formal reference to Minimalism, the addition of a great number of subjective and autobiographical citations actually deliberately repudiates this strategy.

For Hildebrandt, the cassette tape as artistic medium, especially in its original function of storage medium, fulfils an important function: it enables the artist to add a further “invisible” dimension to his pictures. Playing with perception in this way is a major characteristic of his work the picture is completed in the head of the viewer. If the contemplation of his art incorporates the heterogeneous cosmos of Gregor Hildebrandt’s references to music, film, literature and, last but not least, art history, his works turn out to be complex montages, in which pictorial associations from different spheres combine and interpenetrate. Hildebrandt employs the material of his every-day environment without aesthetic or theoretical inhibition and playfully links aspects of conceptual art and minimal art with his personal life and experience of pop culture.
Source: wentrupgallery.com

Signature: Signed

About Gregor Hildebrandt

Conceptual, Berlin-based artist Gregor Hildebrandt transforms the near-obsolete relics of recording technology—like VHS, cassettes, and vinyl records—into sculptures, paintings, photographs and installations. To make his signature paintings, Hildebrandt applies tapes directly to the canvas, making impressions with them before finally adhering the cassettes themselves. He is also known to craft massive installations from these materials, including wall-sized “membranes” of extracted recording tape and galleries filled with old vinyl LPs that have been tackily remade into bowls. Though his formal vocabulary draws on minimalist and found-object traditions, Hildebrandt is just as interested in the references to pop culture and nostalgia embedded in the lost recordings. “I really love that there’s something inside the material that you can’t hear,” he says. “And when you see it, you only see black. You can have your own interpretation of the materials and it does something for your experience.”

German, b. 1974, Bad Homburg, Germany, based in Berlin, Germany