To our knowledge this is the only known vintage print of this size (and this early). It is uncolored.

Hans Bellmer took photographs of the doll in the staircase (second doll) in Berlin, at his family's house during 1935. He took two photographs at the bottom of the staircase. The position of the doll in each is …

Medium
Certificate of authenticity
Included (issued by gallery)
Frame
Not included
Series
Series on Poupée

Hans Bellmer adopted his controversial practice—the creation of provocative, often grotesque sculptures of pubescent female dolls—in the 1930s to rebel against the artistic rules and standards of beauty imposed by the Nazi government. After moving to Berlin in 1923, Bellmer became close with the Dada artists, particularly George Grosz, a politically minded painter who furthered Bellmer’s distrust of government. Fearing that his art would be outlawed by the Nazis as “degenerate”, in 1934 Bellmer sought acceptance abroad with André Breton and the French Surrealists, who embraced his work for its revolutionary nature and libidinous engagement with female youth. In addition to his sculptures, Bellmer produced prints, photographs, and drawings, always dealing with themes of abject sexuality and forbidden desire. Also a writer, he referred to his doll projects as “experimental poetry”.

Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions
2019
The Pencil Is a KeyDrawing Center
2017
Hans Bellmer, Sascha Braunig, Matthew RonayOffice Baroque
2014
Disturbing InnocenceThe FLAG Art Foundation
View all

La Poupée, Berlin, 1935/1935c

Silver print unmounted
19 × 19 in
48.3 × 48.3 cm
.
$650,000
Ships from Chalfont, PA, US
Shipping: Free domestic, $175 rest of world
Location
Chalfont
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To our knowledge this is the only known vintage print of this size (and this early). It is …

Medium
Certificate of authenticity
Included (issued by gallery)
Frame
Not included
Series
Series on Poupée

Hans Bellmer adopted his controversial practice—the creation of provocative, often grotesque sculptures of pubescent female dolls—in the 1930s to rebel against the artistic rules and standards of beauty imposed by the Nazi government. After moving to Berlin in 1923, Bellmer became close with the Dada artists, particularly George Grosz, a politically minded painter who furthered Bellmer’s distrust of government. Fearing that his art would be outlawed by the Nazis as “degenerate”, in 1934 Bellmer sought acceptance abroad with André Breton and the French Surrealists, who embraced his work for its revolutionary nature and libidinous engagement with female youth. In addition to his sculptures, Bellmer produced prints, photographs, and drawings, always dealing with themes of abject sexuality and forbidden desire. Also a writer, he referred to his doll projects as “experimental poetry”.

Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)
Other works by Hans Bellmer
Other works from Contemporary Works/Vintage Works
Related works
Related artists