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For Hans Reichel watercolour was the ideal medium allowing him to express his dreamy constellations: calm creatures, fish and birds seem to drift peacefully in a space full of curved lines and float in the incertainty of a fantasy.
The poetic, aquatic, alchemical, and biological world that Hans Reichel depicted in his …

Medium
Condition
In perfect condition
Signature
Hand-signed by artist, Front
Certificate of authenticity
Included (issued by gallery)
Frame
Included

Hans Reichel became a prisoner of war in WWII in 1939 and was interned at various camps until 1944, when he escaped and returned to his artistic career that began in the early 1900s. Reichel's own influences included Paul Klee, with whom he shared a studio building in Munich and an affinity for idiosyncratic symbolism. The influence from his later friendships with Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky (one of the first purely abstract painters), Walter Gropius (founder of Bauhaus), and Lyonel Feininger (a leader of German Expressionism) are revealed in his improvisational, expressive techniques. In 1938, American writer and painter Henry Miller wrote a book in honor of Reichel, filled with intimate notes and hand-drawn pictures in a dedication to his friend and major influence.

Exhibitions
2020
Animal TotemJeanne Bucher Jaeger
2019
Compagnons de routeJeanne Bucher Jaeger

Untitled, 1950

Watercolour and pencil on paper
9 1/5 × 6 3/10 in
23.3 × 15.9 cm
.
Contact for Price
Location
Paris
Certificate
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
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For Hans Reichel watercolour was the ideal medium allowing him to express his dreamy …

Medium
Condition
In perfect condition
Signature
Hand-signed by artist, Front
Certificate of authenticity
Included (issued by gallery)
Frame
Included

Hans Reichel became a prisoner of war in WWII in 1939 and was interned at various camps until 1944, when he escaped and returned to his artistic career that began in the early 1900s. Reichel's own influences included Paul Klee, with whom he shared a studio building in Munich and an affinity for idiosyncratic symbolism. The influence from his later friendships with Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky (one of the first purely abstract painters), Walter Gropius (founder of Bauhaus), and Lyonel Feininger (a leader of German Expressionism) are revealed in his improvisational, expressive techniques. In 1938, American writer and painter Henry Miller wrote a book in honor of Reichel, filled with intimate notes and hand-drawn pictures in a dedication to his friend and major influence.

Exhibitions (2)