Harvey Quaytman, ‘Union Square #6’, 1982, Painting, Oil on shaped canvas, Rago/Wright
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Harvey Quaytman

Union Square #6, 1982

Oil on shaped canvas
Bidding closed
RW
Rago/Wright

99" x 73.5" (irregular)

Medium
Signature
Signed and dated
Harvey Quaytman
American, 1937–2002
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Harvey Quaytman, a self-professed “classical modernist,” began his career in the 1960s at a time when painting had been declared dead. An under-recognized figure in the written history of modernist abstraction, yet always an artist’s artist with a wide range of influence, Quaytman was perceived through the lenses of Constructivism, Minimalism, and Abstract Expressionism. He was also influenced by such visual cues as Islamic calligraphy and the curved wings of airplanes and birds, references that emerge as his oeuvre shifted from the rectangular canvas to the monumental shaped canvasses that are acknowledged as moving abstract painting toward a more sculptural form, reshaping the trajectory of American painting in the 1960s and ’70s. Known for these eccentrically shaped works as well as his later rust cross paintings, Quaytman was a master of color and texture. He skillfully poured paint, spreading Rhoplex over canvas with broad wallpaper brushes after dusting it with pure pigment that settled in thick, unpredictable strata. He later flecked canvas with glass or iron filings and used additives such as marble dust in paint he always mixed himself. He often worked years to find the perfect form for an image, and when asked by an interviewer what the point was of abstraction in a fractured world, he answered, “If you are able to concentrate everything you believe into your work, then it’s ethically and socially valuable.”

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Harvey Quaytman, ‘Union Square #6’, 1982, Painting, Oil on shaped canvas, Rago/Wright
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Save
Save
Share
Share
RW
Rago/Wright

99" x 73.5" (irregular)

Medium
Signature
Signed and dated
Harvey Quaytman
American, 1937–2002
Follow

Harvey Quaytman, a self-professed “classical modernist,” began his career in the 1960s at a time when painting had been declared dead. An under-recognized figure in the written history of modernist abstraction, yet always an artist’s artist with a wide range of influence, Quaytman was perceived through the lenses of Constructivism, Minimalism, and Abstract Expressionism. He was also influenced by such visual cues as Islamic calligraphy and the curved wings of airplanes and birds, references that emerge as his oeuvre shifted from the rectangular canvas to the monumental shaped canvasses that are acknowledged as moving abstract painting toward a more sculptural form, reshaping the trajectory of American painting in the 1960s and ’70s. Known for these eccentrically shaped works as well as his later rust cross paintings, Quaytman was a master of color and texture. He skillfully poured paint, spreading Rhoplex over canvas with broad wallpaper brushes after dusting it with pure pigment that settled in thick, unpredictable strata. He later flecked canvas with glass or iron filings and used additives such as marble dust in paint he always mixed himself. He often worked years to find the perfect form for an image, and when asked by an interviewer what the point was of abstraction in a fractured world, he answered, “If you are able to concentrate everything you believe into your work, then it’s ethically and socially valuable.”

Harvey Quaytman

Union Square #6, 1982

Oil on shaped canvas
Bidding closed
Other works by Harvey Quaytman
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