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IP
Iris Project
Venice

Text reads "She got close & still She Brought up the Bandit."

Previously folded vertically in thirds, at some point this work was backed with a heat set tissue, possibly intended for photography

Medium
Condition
No apparent fading or damage
Signature
Hand-signed by artist, Signed "Cliff" on left side of face, between lightning bolts and "CW" on right side
Frame
Included

H.C. Westermann is known for his folkloric sculptures and works on paper that pair strong moral commentary with playfulness and humor, particularly in his recurring image of the Death Ship. Influenced by his combat experience in World War II and Korea, he frequently depicted scenes of ships burning or sinking among doomed human figures in rat-infested ports. His carved wood sculptures, mixed-media assemblages, and lithographs, woodcuts, and linoleum prints reference Surrealism, Expressionism, Pop art, and "low art" forms like comic books.

Collected by a major museum
Anderson Collection at Stanford University
Selected exhibitions
2019
H.C. Westermann: Works on PaperVENUS
2018
The Chicago Show56 Downing Street
Party in the FrontFleisher/Ollman
View all

She Brought Up the Bandit, ca. 1968

Graphite, watercolor and ink on wove paper
9 × 12 in
22.9 × 30.5 cm
.
$25,000
Ships from Venice, CA, US
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Location
Venice
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IP
Iris Project
Venice

Text reads "She got close & still She Brought up the Bandit."

Previously folded …

Medium
Condition
No apparent fading or damage
Signature
Hand-signed by artist, Signed "Cliff" on left side of face, between lightning bolts and "CW" on right side
Frame
Included

H.C. Westermann is known for his folkloric sculptures and works on paper that pair strong moral commentary with playfulness and humor, particularly in his recurring image of the Death Ship. Influenced by his combat experience in World War II and Korea, he frequently depicted scenes of ships burning or sinking among doomed human figures in rat-infested ports. His carved wood sculptures, mixed-media assemblages, and lithographs, woodcuts, and linoleum prints reference Surrealism, Expressionism, Pop art, and "low art" forms like comic books.

Collected by a major museum
Anderson Collection at Stanford University
Selected exhibitions (3)
Other works by H.C. Westermann
Related works