Helder Batista, ‘Little Ballet Slippers (Noir) ’, 2017, Artist's Proof
Helder Batista, ‘Little Ballet Slippers (Noir) ’, 2017, Artist's Proof
Helder Batista, ‘Little Ballet Slippers (Noir) ’, 2017, Artist's Proof
Helder Batista, ‘Little Ballet Slippers (Noir) ’, 2017, Artist's Proof
Helder Batista, ‘Little Ballet Slippers (Noir) ’, 2017, Artist's Proof
Helder Batista, ‘Little Ballet Slippers (Noir) ’, 2017, Artist's Proof
Helder Batista, ‘Little Ballet Slippers (Noir) ’, 2017, Artist's Proof

Handmade ballet slippers suspended in resin.

Batista is intrigued by the complexity and potential of everyday objects, even those as mundane as bicycle’s tires. Batista decided to insert himself and interrupt societal structures that destine such objects to “a vocation of waste.” In his exploration of materials, Batista discovered that his ‘found’ objects could function as support, medium, and subject, or as self-sustained complete works of art. Batista avoids polluting his found objects even through his own curatorial presence, arguing that assigning a value to some over others creates contaminating waste. Instead, Batista sublimates, recycles and allows his materials space to articulate themselves. Often a simple clear acrylic mold utilized in works like Lego or Red Shoes is enough of a change in context to infuse everyday objects with artistic poignancy.

Signature: Yes

About Helder Batista