Helen Oji, ‘Red Peppers’, 1991, Painting, Oil on canvas, Estrada Fine Art
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Helen Oji

Red Peppers, 1991

Oil on canvas
14 × 16 37/50 × 2 1/4 in
35.6 × 42.5 × 5.7 cm
$1,800
Location
Los Angeles
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About the work
Helen Oji
American, b. 1950
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Shortly after moving to New York City in 1976 from her hometown of Sacramento, CA, Helen Oji burst onto the 1980s New York art scene with her “Kimono” series. Folding multiple sheets of paper in what she has described as a “pseudo-origami process,” Oji built kimono-shaped canvases that were then thickly layered with acrylic and rhoplex to incorporate textured, arresting images of natural phenomena—volcanos, swarms of bees, etc.—and Japanese iconography. In 1990, Oji became a founding member of the Godzilla Asian American Artists Network, a collective borne out of New York City’s Chinatown. The collective openly criticized the Whitney Museum for its dismissal of Asian American artists, produced exhibitions and artistic collaborations, and addressed political issues, including the murder of Vincent Chin. Throughout her prolific career, Oji’s work has evolved to include abstract, web-like sculptures; installations and set design; paintings depicting explosive phenomena and quotidian scenes; and meditations on her Japanese heritage.

Helen Oji, ‘Red Peppers’, 1991, Painting, Oil on canvas, Estrada Fine Art
Save
Save
Share
Share
About the work
Helen Oji
American, b. 1950
Follow

Shortly after moving to New York City in 1976 from her hometown of Sacramento, CA, Helen Oji burst onto the 1980s New York art scene with her “Kimono” series. Folding multiple sheets of paper in what she has described as a “pseudo-origami process,” Oji built kimono-shaped canvases that were then thickly layered with acrylic and rhoplex to incorporate textured, arresting images of natural phenomena—volcanos, swarms of bees, etc.—and Japanese iconography. In 1990, Oji became a founding member of the Godzilla Asian American Artists Network, a collective borne out of New York City’s Chinatown. The collective openly criticized the Whitney Museum for its dismissal of Asian American artists, produced exhibitions and artistic collaborations, and addressed political issues, including the murder of Vincent Chin. Throughout her prolific career, Oji’s work has evolved to include abstract, web-like sculptures; installations and set design; paintings depicting explosive phenomena and quotidian scenes; and meditations on her Japanese heritage.

Helen Oji

Red Peppers, 1991

Oil on canvas
14 × 16 37/50 × 2 1/4 in
35.6 × 42.5 × 5.7 cm
$1,800
Location
Los Angeles
Have a question? Visit our help center.
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