Henri Matisse, ‘"Landmarks in Modern Art", 1940-41, group exhibition announcement, Pierre Matisse Gallery NYC (PICASSO's FIRST SHOWING IN AMERICA)’, 1940-41, Ephemera or Merchandise, Lithograph on paper, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
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"Landmarks in Modern Art", 1940-41, group exhibition announcement, Pierre Matisse Gallery NYC (PICASSO's FIRST SHOWING IN AMERICA), 1940-41

Lithograph on paper
10 3/4 × 9 in
27.3 × 22.9 cm
.
$450
Ships from MIAMI, FL, US
Shipping: $20 domestic, $35 rest of world
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
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About the work
VINCE fine arts/ephemera

"Landmarks in Modern Art", 1940, group exhibition announcement, Pierre Matisse Gallery …

Medium
Condition
Near MINT
Signature
Not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Pierre Matisse Gallery, NYC
Henri Matisse
French, 1869–1954
Follow

Henri Matisse was a leading figure of Fauvism and, along with Pablo Picasso, one of the most influential artists of the modern era. In his paintings, sculptures, and works on paper, Matisse experimented with vivid colors, Pointillist techniques, and reduced, flat shapes. “What I dream of is an art of balance, of purity and serenity, devoid of troubling or depressing subject matter,” he once said; his subjects of choice included nudes, dancers, still lifes, and interior scenes. Matisse’s animated brushwork and seemingly arbitrary application of bright colors, as in Woman with a Hat (1905), would prove foundational to Fauvism, while his similarly radical The Red Studio (1911) was a seminal, nearly monochromatic study in perspective. Later in life, physically debilitated, Matisse would turn to making bold, cut-paper collages. He has influenced a wide range of important 20th-century painters, from Hans Hofmann and Milton Avery to Tom Wesselmann and David Hockney.

Pablo Picasso
Spanish, 1881–1973
Follow

A prolific and tireless innovator of art forms, Pablo Picasso impacted the course of 20th-century art with unparalleled magnitude. Inspired by African and Iberian art and developments in the world around him, Picasso contributed significantly to a number of artistic movements, notably Cubism, Surrealism, Neoclassicism, and Expressionism. Along with Georges Braque, Picasso is best known for pioneering Cubism in an attempt to reconcile three-dimensional space with the two-dimensional picture plane, once asking, “Are we to paint what’s on the face, what’s inside the face, or what’s behind it?” Responding to the Spanish Civil War, he painted his most famous work, Guernica (1937), whose violent images of anguished figures rendered in grisaille made it a definitive work of anti-war art. “Painting is not made to decorate apartments,” he said. “It’s an offensive and defensive weapon against the enemy.” Picasso’s sizable oeuvre includes over 20,000 paintings, prints, drawings, sculptures, ceramics, theater sets, and costume designs.

Giorgio de Chirico
Italian, 1888–1978
Follow

The founder of the scuola metafisica, Giorgio de Chirico is best known for his metaphysical paintings, produced between 1909 and 1919. These melancholic renderings of low-lit town squares with long shadows and empty walkways would profoundly influence the Surrealists, including André Breton, Salvador Dalí, and René Magritte. In their thematic exploration of alienation, nostalgia, and myth, de Chirico’s works—many of which were exhibited at the Paris Salons—are also said to have influenced filmmakers such as Michelangelo Antonioni and draw parallels with contemporary works by Edward Hopper. De Chirico later rejected his earlier metaphysical style and became interested in traditional painting techniques, working in Neoclassical or neo-Baroque styles influenced by Raphael, Luca Signorelli, and Peter Paul Rubens. The Surrealists were publicly critical of this anti-modern development in de Chirico’s work and the artist eventually ended his association with the group. He cited the writings of Friedrich Nietzsche as a deep influence.

Constantin Brâncuși
Romanian-French, 1876–1957
Follow

Seminal modern sculptor Constantin Brancusi created metal castings and carvings in stone and wood that, unadorned and reduced in form, fulfilled his famous principle: “What is real is not the appearance, but the idea, the essence of things.” After moving to Paris from his native Romania, Brancusi was invited to study in Auguste Rodin’s workshop, but left after two months with the explanation that, “Nothing can grow under big trees.” Brancusi’s signature style is graceful in its simplicity, as with his iconic The Kiss (1907-1910) and Bird (1940); he would return to these and other motifs throughout his career, centered on primordial, biomorphic forms. Brancusi was influenced by art and folklore of Cycladic, African, and Romanian cultures, and he inspired numerous sculptors to focus on fundamental concerns of form and space, including Richard Serra and Isamu Noguchi, the latter serving as his studio assistant in 1927.

Georges Braque
French, 1882–1963
Follow

French painter, collagist and sculptor Georges Braque is, along with Pablo Picasso, renowned as the co-founder of Cubism, which revolutionized 20th-century painting. In his work, objects are fragmented and reconstructed into geometric forms, fracturing the picture plane in order to explore a variety of viewpoints. “The hard-and-fast rules of perspective … were a ghastly mistake which…has taken four centuries to redress,” he said in 1957. Merging aspects of the sculptural with the pictorial, Braque was also an innovator in the use of collage, inventing a technique known as papier collé, which he first explored in one early work Fruit Dish and Glass (1912) by attaching pieces of wallpaper to a charcoal drawing. This approach deeply influenced not only his contemporaries but generations of artists from Modernism to the present.

Juan Gris
Spanish, 1887–1927
Follow

Originally trained in math and physics, Juan Gris moved to Paris in 1906, where he met Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque and became involved in the Cubist movement. Gris took a highly mathematical approach to Cubist painting, rendering discrete forms with precision and exactitude, the resulting images almost resembling technical drawings. The composition of Jar, Flask, and Glass (1911), for example, was derived from an underlying grid structure, the different modules depicting different planar perspectives and yielding an overall composition that is both fractured and flattened. Gris also experimented with Pointillism in works such as Newspaper and Fruit Dish (1916), and often alluded to earlier artists such as Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot and Paul Cézanne through both style and subject matter.

Joan Miró
Spanish, 1893–1983
Follow

Joan Miró rejected the constraints of traditional painting, creating works “conceived with fire in the soul but executed with clinical coolness,” as he once said. Widely considered one of the leading Surrealists, though never officially part of the group, Miró pioneered a wandering linear style of Automatism—a method of “random” drawing that attempted to express the inner workings of the human psyche. Miró used color and form in a symbolic rather than literal manner, his intricate compositions combining abstract elements with recurring motifs like birds, eyes, and the moon. “I try to apply colors like words that shape poems, like notes that shape music,” he said. While he prized artistic freedom, Miró revered art history, basing a series of works on the Dutch Baroque interiors of Hendrick Sorgh and Jan Steen. In turn, Miró has inspired many artists—significantly Arshile Gorky, whose bold linear abstractions proved a foundational influence on Abstract Expressionism.

Georges Rouault
French, 1871–1958
Follow

A pioneering expressionist painter (influenced by the German Expressionists, though not formally associated with that group), Georges Rouault created pictures recognizable for the thick black brushstrokes that outline their subjects, as in le lutteur, no. 3 (1913). Rouault’s works resemble the cloissonisme of decorative glasswork, a look often attributed to the artist’s teenage years spent as a glass painter’s apprentice. In 1891 Rouault enrolled at the École des Beaux-Arts and studied closely under Symbolist Gustave Moreau. He later associated with the Fauvists and collaborated with Henri Matisse and André Derain to organize the Salon d’Automne, an exhibition of progressive art rejected by the more conservative Paris Salon. But rather than create pleasing “armchair” pictures like those of many of his contemporaries, Rouault applied his rough painterly style to religious subjects, clowns, and circus performers, using these motifs to reflect on religion, morality, and modern life.

André Derain
French, 1880–1954
Follow

A founding member of Fauvism, Andre Derain is known for his innovative landscape and cityscape paintings in which he transforms the subject with bold and largely unrealistic colors. Early in his career Derain worked closely with fellow Fauves Maurice de Vlaminck and Henri Matisse, the latter helping convince Derain’s family to let him pursue a career in painting. In Derain’s celebrated depictions of London’s Thames River and Tower Bridge, he applied each color separately in dots or dabs, inviting associations with the Divisionist technique of Paul Signac and Georges Seurat. Derain’s later work features more subtle tones and new subjects, including portraiture and still life. Inspired by his friendship with Pablo Picasso, Derain’s post-Fauve works show an engagement with both classicism and Cubism, and this so called “classical” style earned him widespread recognition throughout Europe and the United States.

Yves Tanguy
French, 1900–1955
Follow

A glimpse of Giorgio de Chirico’s painting Child’s Skull (1914) through a gallery window so profoundly affected Yves Tanguy, it prompted him to pick up a paintbrush. Self-taught, he befriended and drew inspiration from André Breton (and later Alexander Calder), joining the Surrealist movement and consistently representing one of the purest strains of the style. Initially, his love of nature, especially the sea, led Tanguy to paint hazy sea creatures and aquatic vegetation, yet he is best known for his sparse, abstract landscapes populated by biomorphic shapes and painted in somber hues. Though often horizonless, some of his landscapes hint at the rocky coast of his native Brittany, with its Neolithic structures, and at geological formations encountered on trips to Tunisia and the American Southwest. Solemnity permeates his work, in contrast to the playfulness expressed by many of his fellow Surrealists.

Fernand Léger
French, 1881–1955
Follow

Working in Paris during the height of Cubism, Fernand Léger’s iconic style, with its emphasis on primary colors and rounded, massive forms, has become informally regarded as “Tubism.” Even at their most abstract, Léger’s subjects are easier to recognize than the rigorous Cubist dissections of Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, and the accessibility and contemporary subject matter of his works have led many to describe Léger as both populist and a forerunner of Pop Art. Interested in modern innovation, Léger joined the Puteaux Cubists, engaging with Robert Delaunay, Francis Picabia, and Jean Metzinger, among others. His interest in industry and machines was further encouraged by the Italian Futurist painters, and by his military service for France during World War I. While Léger would later revisit more traditional subjects—including the female nude, landscape and still life—these works retained his characteristically bold style.

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Henri Matisse, ‘"Landmarks in Modern Art", 1940-41, group exhibition announcement, Pierre Matisse Gallery NYC (PICASSO's FIRST SHOWING IN AMERICA)’, 1940-41, Ephemera or Merchandise, Lithograph on paper, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
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Save
View
View in room
Share
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About the work
VINCE fine arts/ephemera

"Landmarks in Modern Art", 1940, group exhibition announcement, Pierre Matisse Gallery NYC.

Artists represented in this show:
Brancusi
Braque
Chirico
Derain (FIRST SHOWING in AMERICA)
Gris
Leger,
Matisse,
Miro,
Picasso (FIRST SHOWING in AMERICA)
Rouault (FIRST SHOWING in AMERICA)
Tanguy (FIRST SHOWING in AMERICA)

Medium
Condition
Near MINT
Signature
Not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Pierre Matisse Gallery, NYC
Henri Matisse
French, 1869–1954
Follow

Henri Matisse was a leading figure of Fauvism and, along with Pablo Picasso, one of the most influential artists of the modern era. In his paintings, sculptures, and works on paper, Matisse experimented with vivid colors, Pointillist techniques, and reduced, flat shapes. “What I dream of is an art of balance, of purity and serenity, devoid of troubling or depressing subject matter,” he once said; his subjects of choice included nudes, dancers, still lifes, and interior scenes. Matisse’s animated brushwork and seemingly arbitrary application of bright colors, as in Woman with a Hat (1905), would prove foundational to Fauvism, while his similarly radical The Red Studio (1911) was a seminal, nearly monochromatic study in perspective. Later in life, physically debilitated, Matisse would turn to making bold, cut-paper collages. He has influenced a wide range of important 20th-century painters, from Hans Hofmann and Milton Avery to Tom Wesselmann and David Hockney.

Pablo Picasso
Spanish, 1881–1973
Follow

A prolific and tireless innovator of art forms, Pablo Picasso impacted the course of 20th-century art with unparalleled magnitude. Inspired by African and Iberian art and developments in the world around him, Picasso contributed significantly to a number of artistic movements, notably Cubism, Surrealism, Neoclassicism, and Expressionism. Along with Georges Braque, Picasso is best known for pioneering Cubism in an attempt to reconcile three-dimensional space with the two-dimensional picture plane, once asking, “Are we to paint what’s on the face, what’s inside the face, or what’s behind it?” Responding to the Spanish Civil War, he painted his most famous work, Guernica (1937), whose violent images of anguished figures rendered in grisaille made it a definitive work of anti-war art. “Painting is not made to decorate apartments,” he said. “It’s an offensive and defensive weapon against the enemy.” Picasso’s sizable oeuvre includes over 20,000 paintings, prints, drawings, sculptures, ceramics, theater sets, and costume designs.

Giorgio de Chirico
Italian, 1888–1978
Follow

The founder of the scuola metafisica, Giorgio de Chirico is best known for his metaphysical paintings, produced between 1909 and 1919. These melancholic renderings of low-lit town squares with long shadows and empty walkways would profoundly influence the Surrealists, including André Breton, Salvador Dalí, and René Magritte. In their thematic exploration of alienation, nostalgia, and myth, de Chirico’s works—many of which were exhibited at the Paris Salons—are also said to have influenced filmmakers such as Michelangelo Antonioni and draw parallels with contemporary works by Edward Hopper. De Chirico later rejected his earlier metaphysical style and became interested in traditional painting techniques, working in Neoclassical or neo-Baroque styles influenced by Raphael, Luca Signorelli, and Peter Paul Rubens. The Surrealists were publicly critical of this anti-modern development in de Chirico’s work and the artist eventually ended his association with the group. He cited the writings of Friedrich Nietzsche as a deep influence.

Constantin Brâncuși
Romanian-French, 1876–1957
Follow

Seminal modern sculptor Constantin Brancusi created metal castings and carvings in stone and wood that, unadorned and reduced in form, fulfilled his famous principle: “What is real is not the appearance, but the idea, the essence of things.” After moving to Paris from his native Romania, Brancusi was invited to study in Auguste Rodin’s workshop, but left after two months with the explanation that, “Nothing can grow under big trees.” Brancusi’s signature style is graceful in its simplicity, as with his iconic The Kiss (1907-1910) and Bird (1940); he would return to these and other motifs throughout his career, centered on primordial, biomorphic forms. Brancusi was influenced by art and folklore of Cycladic, African, and Romanian cultures, and he inspired numerous sculptors to focus on fundamental concerns of form and space, including Richard Serra and Isamu Noguchi, the latter serving as his studio assistant in 1927.

Georges Braque
French, 1882–1963
Follow

French painter, collagist and sculptor Georges Braque is, along with Pablo Picasso, renowned as the co-founder of Cubism, which revolutionized 20th-century painting. In his work, objects are fragmented and reconstructed into geometric forms, fracturing the picture plane in order to explore a variety of viewpoints. “The hard-and-fast rules of perspective … were a ghastly mistake which…has taken four centuries to redress,” he said in 1957. Merging aspects of the sculptural with the pictorial, Braque was also an innovator in the use of collage, inventing a technique known as papier collé, which he first explored in one early work Fruit Dish and Glass (1912) by attaching pieces of wallpaper to a charcoal drawing. This approach deeply influenced not only his contemporaries but generations of artists from Modernism to the present.

Juan Gris
Spanish, 1887–1927
Follow

Originally trained in math and physics, Juan Gris moved to Paris in 1906, where he met Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque and became involved in the Cubist movement. Gris took a highly mathematical approach to Cubist painting, rendering discrete forms with precision and exactitude, the resulting images almost resembling technical drawings. The composition of Jar, Flask, and Glass (1911), for example, was derived from an underlying grid structure, the different modules depicting different planar perspectives and yielding an overall composition that is both fractured and flattened. Gris also experimented with Pointillism in works such as Newspaper and Fruit Dish (1916), and often alluded to earlier artists such as Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot and Paul Cézanne through both style and subject matter.

Joan Miró
Spanish, 1893–1983
Follow

Joan Miró rejected the constraints of traditional painting, creating works “conceived with fire in the soul but executed with clinical coolness,” as he once said. Widely considered one of the leading Surrealists, though never officially part of the group, Miró pioneered a wandering linear style of Automatism—a method of “random” drawing that attempted to express the inner workings of the human psyche. Miró used color and form in a symbolic rather than literal manner, his intricate compositions combining abstract elements with recurring motifs like birds, eyes, and the moon. “I try to apply colors like words that shape poems, like notes that shape music,” he said. While he prized artistic freedom, Miró revered art history, basing a series of works on the Dutch Baroque interiors of Hendrick Sorgh and Jan Steen. In turn, Miró has inspired many artists—significantly Arshile Gorky, whose bold linear abstractions proved a foundational influence on Abstract Expressionism.

Georges Rouault
French, 1871–1958
Follow

A pioneering expressionist painter (influenced by the German Expressionists, though not formally associated with that group), Georges Rouault created pictures recognizable for the thick black brushstrokes that outline their subjects, as in le lutteur, no. 3 (1913). Rouault’s works resemble the cloissonisme of decorative glasswork, a look often attributed to the artist’s teenage years spent as a glass painter’s apprentice. In 1891 Rouault enrolled at the École des Beaux-Arts and studied closely under Symbolist Gustave Moreau. He later associated with the Fauvists and collaborated with Henri Matisse and André Derain to organize the Salon d’Automne, an exhibition of progressive art rejected by the more conservative Paris Salon. But rather than create pleasing “armchair” pictures like those of many of his contemporaries, Rouault applied his rough painterly style to religious subjects, clowns, and circus performers, using these motifs to reflect on religion, morality, and modern life.

André Derain
French, 1880–1954
Follow

A founding member of Fauvism, Andre Derain is known for his innovative landscape and cityscape paintings in which he transforms the subject with bold and largely unrealistic colors. Early in his career Derain worked closely with fellow Fauves Maurice de Vlaminck and Henri Matisse, the latter helping convince Derain’s family to let him pursue a career in painting. In Derain’s celebrated depictions of London’s Thames River and Tower Bridge, he applied each color separately in dots or dabs, inviting associations with the Divisionist technique of Paul Signac and Georges Seurat. Derain’s later work features more subtle tones and new subjects, including portraiture and still life. Inspired by his friendship with Pablo Picasso, Derain’s post-Fauve works show an engagement with both classicism and Cubism, and this so called “classical” style earned him widespread recognition throughout Europe and the United States.

Yves Tanguy
French, 1900–1955
Follow

A glimpse of Giorgio de Chirico’s painting Child’s Skull (1914) through a gallery window so profoundly affected Yves Tanguy, it prompted him to pick up a paintbrush. Self-taught, he befriended and drew inspiration from André Breton (and later Alexander Calder), joining the Surrealist movement and consistently representing one of the purest strains of the style. Initially, his love of nature, especially the sea, led Tanguy to paint hazy sea creatures and aquatic vegetation, yet he is best known for his sparse, abstract landscapes populated by biomorphic shapes and painted in somber hues. Though often horizonless, some of his landscapes hint at the rocky coast of his native Brittany, with its Neolithic structures, and at geological formations encountered on trips to Tunisia and the American Southwest. Solemnity permeates his work, in contrast to the playfulness expressed by many of his fellow Surrealists.

Fernand Léger
French, 1881–1955
Follow

Working in Paris during the height of Cubism, Fernand Léger’s iconic style, with its emphasis on primary colors and rounded, massive forms, has become informally regarded as “Tubism.” Even at their most abstract, Léger’s subjects are easier to recognize than the rigorous Cubist dissections of Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, and the accessibility and contemporary subject matter of his works have led many to describe Léger as both populist and a forerunner of Pop Art. Interested in modern innovation, Léger joined the Puteaux Cubists, engaging with Robert Delaunay, Francis Picabia, and Jean Metzinger, among others. His interest in industry and machines was further encouraged by the Italian Futurist painters, and by his military service for France during World War I. While Léger would later revisit more traditional subjects—including the female nude, landscape and still life—these works retained his characteristically bold style.

"Landmarks in Modern Art", 1940-41, group exhibition announcement, Pierre Matisse Gallery NYC (PICASSO's FIRST SHOWING IN AMERICA), 1940-41

Lithograph on paper
10 3/4 × 9 in
27.3 × 22.9 cm
.
$450
Ships from MIAMI, FL, US
Shipping: $20 domestic, $35 rest of world
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Locked
Secure payment
Secure transactions by credit card through Stripe.
Learn more.
Have a question? Visit our help center.
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
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