Ho Sin Tung, ‘Black Box 16 artworks’, 2020, Print, UV inkjet-print on Antalis Wove Diamond White, 220gsm, acid free, FSC-certified paper, Para Site Benefit Auction
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Black Box 16 artworks, 2020

UV inkjet-print on Antalis Wove Diamond White, 220gsm, acid free, FSC-certified paper
16 1/2 × 23 2/5 in
42 × 59.4 cm
Edition 18/44
.
Bidding closed
About the work
Para Site Benefit Auction

Black Box (list of individual print names, respective to artist name list) Too Much Happiness …

Medium
Signature
SIGNED x16, Verso, '18/44 Ti 2019/2020', '18/44
Image rights
Generously donated by the artists
Nadim Abbas
Chinese, b. 1980
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Drawing inspiration from literature, science, and psychology, Nadim Abbas produces heavily researched installations, sculptural works, and photography. With fetishistic fervor toward his subject, Abbas scours flea markets and cheap stores for objects to incorporate into his art or to serve as cues for research—past works have explored the aesthetics of science, coral reefs, and the psychology of kitsch, and included objects such as toy action figures, mirrors, frames, tanks, and windows. “I am one of those people who like to read instruction manuals from cover to cover,” Abbas has said. Fascinated with coral reefs and interested in popular reproductions of nature, Abbas produced an installation piece, Marine Lover (2011), which comprised an 18-meter corridor, along which the artist constructed an artificial bleached reef. “Conceptually, it’s like a cross between an object and a living thing,” he said.

Ko Sin Tung 高倩彤
b. 1987
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Colored-in wallpaper, patched walls, blurred images of domestic paraphernalia—these are but some of Ko Sin Tung’s visual dialogues with the intimate, yet urban environments that people create. Concerned with the impact of 'things,' Ko Sin Tung investigates, through a myriad of mediums and materials, the psychological influences of private objects and the idiosyncratic functions they have been personally channeled to fulfill. A graduate from the Department of Fine Arts at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Ko Sin Tung observes the city’s inhabitants, their close-quarters, and identifies with curiosity their values as dictated through the items they treasure and keep, slowly observing how these objects mirror ways of life, or in the very least, illustrate what is expected for living.

Firenze Lai 黎清妍
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Ivy Ma
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Angela Su
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Pak Sheung Chuen
Chinese, b. 1977
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Performance artist Pak Sheung Chuen (白双全) alters and destabilizes everyday life in an effort to reveal the structures that gird our personal lives. Pak’s work questions the possibility of individual identity within Asian megacities and contemporary globalized society. He is particularly influenced by the United Kingdom’s transfer of Hong Kong sovereignty to China in 1997. His 2009 work Breathing into a House involved the artist collecting his breath in plastic bags while living in a small apartment. After 10 days, the air-filled bags filled the space, rendering it uninhabitable. Pak later said he felt as if the apartment had absorbed his life, as though he had become his own exhalations. Many of his works, including Breathing into a House, can be considered self-experiments, as they rarely involve an audience.

Tsang Kin-Wah
Chinese, b. 1976
Follow

In painting, wallpaper, murals, and video work, Tsang Kin-Wah explores sexuality, religion, and humanity’s darker instincts. A recurring motif in his work is floral-patterned paintings and wallpaper designs that are inspired by William Morris and which, upon closer inspection, reveal swirling sentences and blocks of text. For his installation I love you more than anything else in the whole world and I would never do anything to hurt you (2008), Tsang adorned the walls of a gallery with gloss-white lettering applied in snaking patterns. Viewers who looked closely would find sentences such as “I am not gonna hurt you or fuck you,” and “I would never cut you up in pieces.” The soundtrack to Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining accompanied the installation, which reflected the film’s masked threat of violence as the discrete whiteness of the text pretends at innocence. Tsang aims to capture the more insidious aspects of human relationships: “There is always a conflict between the first impression and the so-called real thing behind it,” he says.

Sara Wong
Chinese
Follow

Sara Wong’s artwork engages the urban and social conditions in Hong Kong. Perhaps drawing inspiration from the Situationists, Wong creates psychogeographies of her city in performative interventions into map-making. For Local Orientation, the artist drifted through Hong Kong, following illogical routes and filming her journey, in effect documenting urban living, sights, and the passage of time. Her aimless path resists the purposeful action of most city life. “When I don’t look at a map, but instead build my own ‘map’ in my head, and then I check an actual map and see the discrepancy between where I thought I was and where I really am, that triggers something in me,” Wong has said. Though the piece dates to 1998, Wong returned to it in 2002 and 2013, highlighting changes in Hong Kong. The piece exemplifies her larger project of reckoning with the specificity of a place and how a person intersects with it.

Samson Young 楊嘉輝
Chinese, b. 1979
Follow

Multicultural paradigms, weaved into a symphony of image and sound, are at the heart of Hong Kong artist and composer Samson Young’s practice. With a formal cross-cultural training in music composition, Young channels his attunement to melody by pushing its formalist boundaries to create innovative cross-media experiences that touch upon the recurring topics of identity, war, and literature. Emphasising a sense of play and intellectual witticism through the inclusion of unexpected sounds (ranging from the ring of Gameboys, fanfare rides, and Cantonese nursery rhymes) to references of great works of fiction, Young builds peculiar scenarios that challenge one’s everyday associations with objects, stories, and spaces.

Leung Chi Wo 梁志和
Hong Kong, b. 1968
Follow

Leung Chi Wo’s is a self-described artist of “photography, sculpture, craftswork, food, performance, furniture, installation, video,” all of which become ways that Leung looks at ethnic identity and history, at both local and global scales. Leung, who studied at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and co-founded the artist space Para/Site in 1996, is particularly interested in the identity and politics of Hong Kong after its return to China. Some pieces make use of text in both English and Chinese, or engage with local inhabitants and sites. Leung conversely looks at the effects of globalization and global consumerism on cultures around the world. In 2007, Leung completed a series of paintings on canvas featuring western logos, brands, and celebrity names translated into languages like Arabic, Thai, and Hebrew.

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Ho Sin Tung, ‘Black Box 16 artworks’, 2020, Print, UV inkjet-print on Antalis Wove Diamond White, 220gsm, acid free, FSC-certified paper, Para Site Benefit Auction
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About the work
Para Site Benefit Auction

Black Box (list of individual print names, respective to artist name list) Too Much Happiness 《多幸福》, C(r)Y, Temporary Storage (video still) 《臨時儲存(錄像截圖)》, 2014 & 2019, Strangers 《陌生人》, Your skin, Lily (distance) 《百合花,距離。》, Celebration of the National Liberation Day of Korea on the top floor of the Mandarin Hotel on …

Medium
Signature
SIGNED x16, Verso, '18/44 Ti 2019/2020', '18/44
Image rights
Generously donated by the artists
Nadim Abbas
Chinese, b. 1980
Follow

Drawing inspiration from literature, science, and psychology, Nadim Abbas produces heavily researched installations, sculptural works, and photography. With fetishistic fervor toward his subject, Abbas scours flea markets and cheap stores for objects to incorporate into his art or to serve as cues for research—past works have explored the aesthetics of science, coral reefs, and the psychology of kitsch, and included objects such as toy action figures, mirrors, frames, tanks, and windows. “I am one of those people who like to read instruction manuals from cover to cover,” Abbas has said. Fascinated with coral reefs and interested in popular reproductions of nature, Abbas produced an installation piece, Marine Lover (2011), which comprised an 18-meter corridor, along which the artist constructed an artificial bleached reef. “Conceptually, it’s like a cross between an object and a living thing,” he said.

Ko Sin Tung 高倩彤
b. 1987
Follow

Colored-in wallpaper, patched walls, blurred images of domestic paraphernalia—these are but some of Ko Sin Tung’s visual dialogues with the intimate, yet urban environments that people create. Concerned with the impact of 'things,' Ko Sin Tung investigates, through a myriad of mediums and materials, the psychological influences of private objects and the idiosyncratic functions they have been personally channeled to fulfill. A graduate from the Department of Fine Arts at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Ko Sin Tung observes the city’s inhabitants, their close-quarters, and identifies with curiosity their values as dictated through the items they treasure and keep, slowly observing how these objects mirror ways of life, or in the very least, illustrate what is expected for living.

Firenze Lai 黎清妍
Follow
Ivy Ma
Follow
Angela Su
Follow
Pak Sheung Chuen
Chinese, b. 1977
Follow

Performance artist Pak Sheung Chuen (白双全) alters and destabilizes everyday life in an effort to reveal the structures that gird our personal lives. Pak’s work questions the possibility of individual identity within Asian megacities and contemporary globalized society. He is particularly influenced by the United Kingdom’s transfer of Hong Kong sovereignty to China in 1997. His 2009 work Breathing into a House involved the artist collecting his breath in plastic bags while living in a small apartment. After 10 days, the air-filled bags filled the space, rendering it uninhabitable. Pak later said he felt as if the apartment had absorbed his life, as though he had become his own exhalations. Many of his works, including Breathing into a House, can be considered self-experiments, as they rarely involve an audience.

Tsang Kin-Wah
Chinese, b. 1976
Follow

In painting, wallpaper, murals, and video work, Tsang Kin-Wah explores sexuality, religion, and humanity’s darker instincts. A recurring motif in his work is floral-patterned paintings and wallpaper designs that are inspired by William Morris and which, upon closer inspection, reveal swirling sentences and blocks of text. For his installation I love you more than anything else in the whole world and I would never do anything to hurt you (2008), Tsang adorned the walls of a gallery with gloss-white lettering applied in snaking patterns. Viewers who looked closely would find sentences such as “I am not gonna hurt you or fuck you,” and “I would never cut you up in pieces.” The soundtrack to Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining accompanied the installation, which reflected the film’s masked threat of violence as the discrete whiteness of the text pretends at innocence. Tsang aims to capture the more insidious aspects of human relationships: “There is always a conflict between the first impression and the so-called real thing behind it,” he says.

Sara Wong
Chinese
Follow

Sara Wong’s artwork engages the urban and social conditions in Hong Kong. Perhaps drawing inspiration from the Situationists, Wong creates psychogeographies of her city in performative interventions into map-making. For Local Orientation, the artist drifted through Hong Kong, following illogical routes and filming her journey, in effect documenting urban living, sights, and the passage of time. Her aimless path resists the purposeful action of most city life. “When I don’t look at a map, but instead build my own ‘map’ in my head, and then I check an actual map and see the discrepancy between where I thought I was and where I really am, that triggers something in me,” Wong has said. Though the piece dates to 1998, Wong returned to it in 2002 and 2013, highlighting changes in Hong Kong. The piece exemplifies her larger project of reckoning with the specificity of a place and how a person intersects with it.

Samson Young 楊嘉輝
Chinese, b. 1979
Follow

Multicultural paradigms, weaved into a symphony of image and sound, are at the heart of Hong Kong artist and composer Samson Young’s practice. With a formal cross-cultural training in music composition, Young channels his attunement to melody by pushing its formalist boundaries to create innovative cross-media experiences that touch upon the recurring topics of identity, war, and literature. Emphasising a sense of play and intellectual witticism through the inclusion of unexpected sounds (ranging from the ring of Gameboys, fanfare rides, and Cantonese nursery rhymes) to references of great works of fiction, Young builds peculiar scenarios that challenge one’s everyday associations with objects, stories, and spaces.

Leung Chi Wo 梁志和
Hong Kong, b. 1968
Follow

Leung Chi Wo’s is a self-described artist of “photography, sculpture, craftswork, food, performance, furniture, installation, video,” all of which become ways that Leung looks at ethnic identity and history, at both local and global scales. Leung, who studied at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and co-founded the artist space Para/Site in 1996, is particularly interested in the identity and politics of Hong Kong after its return to China. Some pieces make use of text in both English and Chinese, or engage with local inhabitants and sites. Leung conversely looks at the effects of globalization and global consumerism on cultures around the world. In 2007, Leung completed a series of paintings on canvas featuring western logos, brands, and celebrity names translated into languages like Arabic, Thai, and Hebrew.

Black Box 16 artworks, 2020

UV inkjet-print on Antalis Wove Diamond White, 220gsm, acid free, FSC-certified paper
16 1/2 × 23 2/5 in
42 × 59.4 cm
Edition 18/44
.
Bidding closed