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Honoré Daumier, ‘Entrez donc dans la mer sans crainte... (Enter the sea without fear...)’, 1856, Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Honoré Daumier, ‘Entrez donc dans la mer sans crainte... (Enter the sea without fear...)’, 1856, Los Angeles County Museum of Art
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Honoré Daumier

Entrez donc dans la mer sans crainte... (Enter the sea without fear...), 1856

Hand-colored lithograph
7 5/8 × 9 13/16 in
19.4 × 24.9 cm
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About the work
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Los Angeles

In the collection of Prints and Drawings at LACMA.

In the collection of Prints and Drawings at LACMA.

Medium
Print
Image rights
Image provided by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Honoré Daumier
French, 1808–1879
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The “Michelangelo of caricature,” Honoré Daumier famously satirized France’s bourgeoisie and justice system, and masterfully exposed the misery of the masses through the emerging medium of lithography. Grotesque caricatures of government officials endeared him to the public, although one-too-many scathing renderings of King Louis-Philippe also landed him six months in prison. Thereafter, he stuck to the safer ground of deriding archetypal professionals such as doctors, professors, and especially lawyers and judges, whom he deemed cruel and pretentious. While his output of lithographs and illustrative drawings was most prodigious (circa 4,000 of each), Daumier also sculpted busts of members of parliament and painted religious and historical themes in the naturalist style, including many notable images of Don Quixote riding his horse. These late works were hardly recognized during his lifetime, yet are acclaimed today for their experimental techniques.

Honoré Daumier, ‘Entrez donc dans la mer sans crainte... (Enter the sea without fear...)’, 1856, Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Honoré Daumier, ‘Entrez donc dans la mer sans crainte... (Enter the sea without fear...)’, 1856, Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
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Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
View more
About the work
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Los Angeles

In the collection of Prints and Drawings at LACMA.

In the collection of Prints and Drawings at LACMA.

Medium
Print
Image rights
Image provided by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Honoré Daumier
French, 1808–1879
Follow

The “Michelangelo of caricature,” Honoré Daumier famously satirized France’s bourgeoisie and justice system, and masterfully exposed the misery of the masses through the emerging medium of lithography. Grotesque caricatures of government officials endeared him to the public, although one-too-many scathing renderings of King Louis-Philippe also landed him six months in prison. Thereafter, he stuck to the safer ground of deriding archetypal professionals such as doctors, professors, and especially lawyers and judges, whom he deemed cruel and pretentious. While his output of lithographs and illustrative drawings was most prodigious (circa 4,000 of each), Daumier also sculpted busts of members of parliament and painted religious and historical themes in the naturalist style, including many notable images of Don Quixote riding his horse. These late works were hardly recognized during his lifetime, yet are acclaimed today for their experimental techniques.

Honoré Daumier

Entrez donc dans la mer sans crainte... (Enter the sea without fear...), 1856

Hand-colored lithograph
7 5/8 × 9 13/16 in
19.4 × 24.9 cm
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
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