Howard Hodgkin, ‘Swimming’, 2011, Joanna Bryant & Julian Page

Only available as part of the complete framed set of 12 Official Prints from the London Olympic and Paralympic Games 2012: Anthea Hamilton - Divers, Martin Creed - Work No. 1273, Howard Hodgkin – Swimming, Bridget Riley – Rose Rose, Chris Ofili - For the Unknown Runner, Rachel Whiteread – LOndOn 2O12, Fiona Banner - Superhuman Nude, Michael Craig-Martin – GO, Tracey Emin - Birds 2012, Gary Hume – Capital, Sarah Morris - Big Ben 2012, Bob and Roberta Smith - LOVE.

12 colour screen print using 'L.Cornelissen' ground light-fast pigments on 300gsm Somerset White Satin paper.

Howard Hodgkin describes his paintings as representational pictures of emotional situations. For his Olympic print Hodgkin has created 'Swimming' - a deep, swirling mass of blue flooding across the page. The fluidity of the brushstrokes perfectly captures the movement of water and the sensation of swimming.

Since 1912, each Olympic Host City has commissioned one or more posters to celebrate the hosting of the Games. The official posters of the Games are now themselves a unique celebration of 100 years of the meeting of art and sport, and a body of iconic work has been created over the last century. For London 2012, a commissioning panel including Tate Director Sir Nicholas Serota invited 12 leading artists to create images, using the Olympic and Paralympic values or the city of London as inspiration. Each resulting artwork is a distinct interpretation of either the Olympic or Paralympic Games.

About Howard Hodgkin

Howard Hodgkin became a prominent figure in British art in the 1970s for painting on wooden supports such as drawing boards and door frames instead of canvas. Using broad, gestural brushstrokes and a vivid palette of contrasting colors that emphasized the rectangular picture plane, Hodgkin defined painting as an object. While his early compositions have a collaged geometric flatness, Hodgkin’s later work, including etchings and aquatint prints, has increasingly incorporated more complex fluid patterning, reminiscent of Henri Matisse’s The Morrocans (1916), Édouard Vuillard’s interiors, and Paturi miniatures from India, of which he was an avid collector.

British, b. 1932, London, United Kingdom