Hugh Scott-Douglas, ‘Untitled’, 2012, Mixed Media, Cyanotype on linen, Phillips
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share

Hugh Scott-Douglas

Untitled, 2012

Cyanotype on linen
93 × 74 in
236.2 × 188 cm
Bidding closed
About the work
Exhibition history
Provenance
P
Phillips
Medium
Signature
Signed and dated "Hugh Scott-Douglas 2012" along the stretcher; further signed "Hugh Scott-Douglas" on a label affixed to the stretcher
Hugh Scott-Douglas
British, b. 1988
Follow

Hugh Scott-Douglas is best known for his cyanotype prints on textiles, which rely on an outmoded form of film development produced by the sun rather than artificial light. Scott-Douglas first designs a patterned motif using computer-generated algorithms, then prints it onto film and exposes it to sunlight over a textile such as canvas; the chromatic variation of the resulting blue-toned images reflects the changing environments they were produced in. He repeats his motifs in different series and materials, including slideshows and laser-cut images. Scott-Douglas has drawn inspiration from cinema, in particular the stage sets and shifting sense of time and space in the 1920s German Expressionist film, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. “I acknowledge cinema as the most inflated form of spectacle, and often draw from filmic examples,” he has said, “not so much for pictorial content of a film, but for the mechanics of the picture.” Scott-Douglas's work achieved record high prices at auction in 2013. He is also founding director (now "creative consultant") for one of Toronto's hottest galleries Tomorrow.

Hugh Scott-Douglas, ‘Untitled’, 2012, Mixed Media, Cyanotype on linen, Phillips
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
About the work
Exhibition history
Provenance
P
Phillips
Medium
Signature
Signed and dated "Hugh Scott-Douglas 2012" along the stretcher; further signed "Hugh Scott-Douglas" on a label affixed to the stretcher
Hugh Scott-Douglas
British, b. 1988
Follow

Hugh Scott-Douglas is best known for his cyanotype prints on textiles, which rely on an outmoded form of film development produced by the sun rather than artificial light. Scott-Douglas first designs a patterned motif using computer-generated algorithms, then prints it onto film and exposes it to sunlight over a textile such as canvas; the chromatic variation of the resulting blue-toned images reflects the changing environments they were produced in. He repeats his motifs in different series and materials, including slideshows and laser-cut images. Scott-Douglas has drawn inspiration from cinema, in particular the stage sets and shifting sense of time and space in the 1920s German Expressionist film, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. “I acknowledge cinema as the most inflated form of spectacle, and often draw from filmic examples,” he has said, “not so much for pictorial content of a film, but for the mechanics of the picture.” Scott-Douglas's work achieved record high prices at auction in 2013. He is also founding director (now "creative consultant") for one of Toronto's hottest galleries Tomorrow.

Hugh Scott-Douglas

Untitled, 2012

Cyanotype on linen
93 × 74 in
236.2 × 188 cm
Bidding closed
Related works
Most Similar