Medium
Image rights
The Studio Museum in Harlem; Museum Purchase and a gift from E. Thomas Williams and Auldlyn Higgins Williams 1997.9.17

Hughie Lee-Smith knew from an early age that art would be his "mission." A classically trained artist, his diverse influences range from the metaphysical imagery of the Italian painter Giorgio de Chirico to the romantic realism of Edward Hopper. Lee-Smith concedes, "In my case, aloneness, I think, has stemmed from the fact that I'm black. Unconsciously it has a lot to do with a sense of alienation." Although his feelings about racial inequities or disharmonies have been inspirational, he seeks to create images that articulate his emotions about social and cultural disparity as it relates to all of humanity. His interest in people and their relationship to the world has been unwavering. While Lee-Smith's dramas have included both black and white protagonists, they are almost always isolated in the landscape and from each other.

Exhibitions
2017
Their Own HarlemsThe Studio Museum in Harlem
2016
Recent AcquisitionsBill Hodges Gallery

Festive Vista, 1980

Oil on canvas
15 × 13 in
38.1 × 33 cm
Location
New York
Medium
Image rights
The Studio Museum in Harlem; Museum Purchase and a gift from E. Thomas Williams and Auldlyn Higgins Williams 1997.9.17

Hughie Lee-Smith knew from an early age that art would be his "mission." A classically trained artist, his diverse influences range from the metaphysical imagery of the Italian painter Giorgio de Chirico to the romantic realism of Edward Hopper. Lee-Smith concedes, "In my case, aloneness, I think, has stemmed from the fact that I'm black. Unconsciously it has a lot to do with a sense of alienation." Although his feelings about racial inequities or disharmonies have been inspirational, he seeks to create images that articulate his emotions about social and cultural disparity as it relates to all of humanity. His interest in people and their relationship to the world has been unwavering. While Lee-Smith's dramas have included both black and white protagonists, they are almost always isolated in the landscape and from each other.

Exhibitions (2)
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