VH
Van Ham

50 x 40 x 0.7cm

Signed verso on label: Isa Genzken. Here also typographically titled, dated, and numbered. Number 69/100. Verso hanging devices.The multiple can be hung in portrait or landscape format.

Medium

Using insubstantial commercial materials to depict what seems indestructible, Isa Genzken’s sculptures explore the tension between permanence and transience. Drawing on the legacies of Constructivism and Minimalism and often involving a critical dialogue with Modernist architecture, Genzken’s works comment on the way we build and destroy our environments, which are an expression of hope as well as a monument to our consumption and destructiveness. Following 9/11, Genzken created a series entitled “Empire/Vampire, Who Kills Death” (2002–03), using her characteristic assortment of disposable materials such as plastic vessels, toy figures, and other detritus to depict scenes of post-apocalyptic devastation and confusion. For her installation Oil, the artist transformed the German Pavilion at the 2007 Venice Biennale into a saturnine and futuristic Gesamtkunstwerk (the German word for “total art-work”).

Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), de la Cruz Collection
Selected exhibitions
2020
Isa Genzken. Works 1973-1983Kunstmuseum Basel
2016
Isa Genzken: Two OrchidsPublic Art Fund
2015
Isa Genzken: Mach Dich Hübsch!Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam
View all

Spiegelbild, 2001

Mirror facets on glass on beaverboard
19 7/10 × 15 7/10 × 3/10 in
50 × 40 × 0.7 cm
Edition 69/100
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VH
Van Ham

50 x 40 x 0.7cm

Signed verso on label: Isa Genzken. Here also typographically titled, dated, and …

Medium

Using insubstantial commercial materials to depict what seems indestructible, Isa Genzken’s sculptures explore the tension between permanence and transience. Drawing on the legacies of Constructivism and Minimalism and often involving a critical dialogue with Modernist architecture, Genzken’s works comment on the way we build and destroy our environments, which are an expression of hope as well as a monument to our consumption and destructiveness. Following 9/11, Genzken created a series entitled “Empire/Vampire, Who Kills Death” (2002–03), using her characteristic assortment of disposable materials such as plastic vessels, toy figures, and other detritus to depict scenes of post-apocalyptic devastation and confusion. For her installation Oil, the artist transformed the German Pavilion at the 2007 Venice Biennale into a saturnine and futuristic Gesamtkunstwerk (the German word for “total art-work”).

Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), de la Cruz Collection
Selected exhibitions (3)
Related works
Related artists