Iván Navarro, ‘Assembly Lines’, 2007, Heritage Auctions
Iván Navarro, ‘Assembly Lines’, 2007, Heritage Auctions
Iván Navarro, ‘Assembly Lines’, 2007, Heritage Auctions
Iván Navarro, ‘Assembly Lines’, 2007, Heritage Auctions
Iván Navarro, ‘Assembly Lines’, 2007, Heritage Auctions

Unframed.

Shipping from New York City.

Navarro’s practice utilizes simple geometric structures created out of industrially produced materials enhanced by neon light and mirrors to create an infinite, optical illusion. These formal elements allude to his history of growing up under the violent dictatorship of General Augusto Pinochet in Chile. Electricity was a key choice of torture preferred by the Chilean government; using electric light as his primary medium, Navarro appropriates the austere language of Minimalism and imbues it with political resonance. The reflective mirror placement of the illuminated piece creates an eerie trompe l’oeil effect, such that the viewer stares down into a seemingly unending dark abyss. The artist once said: “I make spaces in a fictional way to deal with my own psychological anxiety.”

—Courtesy of Heritage Auctions

Karen LaGatta Editions, East Hampton, New York; Private collection, acquired from the above.

About Iván Navarro

Recognized for his suggestive use of fluorescent lights, Iván Navarro makes works rich in both art-historical and social references. Though his use of light bulbs invites comparison to Minimalism, particularly the art of Dan Flavin, Navarro’s work is conceptually quite different. He uses industrial materials to represent recognizable subjects, as with Armory Fence (2011), where he constructs a picket fence with white fluorescent tubing, calling critical attention to the object that has come to epitomize an idealized suburban lifestyle.

Chilean, b. 1972, Santiago, Chile, based in New York, New York