Jackson Pollock, ‘2 PIECE SET- "Jackson Pollock", 1949, Invitation Card, Betty Parsons Gallery NYC  & "Watercolor Sculpture", 1949, Group Show Invite’, 1949, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
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2 PIECE SET- "Jackson Pollock", 1949, Invitation Card, Betty Parsons Gallery NYC & "Watercolor Sculpture", 1949, Group Show Invite, 1949

Silkscreen on card stock
3 3/4 × 9 in
9.5 × 22.9 cm
This is ephemera, an artifact related to the artist.
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Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
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About the work
VINCE fine arts/ephemera

2-PIECE SET:
1.) "Jackson Pollock-Recent Paintings", 1949, Invitation Card, SECOND SHOW at …

Medium
Print
Signature
Not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Jackson Pollock
American, 1912–1956
Follow

Major Abstract Expressionist Jackson Pollock, dubbed "Jack the Dripper" by Time magazine in 1956, is best known for his large "action" or drip paintings of 1947–52, formed by pouring and manipulating liquid paint atop canvases set on the floor. A wholly original, rule-shattering figure in American art, Pollock inspired Frank Stella, Richard Serra, and the Color Field painters. Pollock's early Surrealist works of personal symbols and abstract figures show the influence of José Clemente Orozco, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Pablo Picasso, Paul Klee, Joan Miró, and Max Ernst, as well as his experiences with Jungian psychotherapy.

Milton Avery
American, 1885–1965
Follow

Depicting everyday scenes of domestic, city, and country life, painter and printmaker Milton Avery favored simplified forms and the flat application of color, inspired by Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso. “I try to construct a picture in which shapes, spaces, [and] colors form a set of unique relationships, independent of any subject matter,” he once said. Avery’s early work incorporated elements of Impressionism, but his smooth planes of color and combination of figuration and abstraction would make him an archetype of American Modernism, prefiguring aspects of Color Field painting by years. Avery was a friend and source of inspiration to artists including Mark Rothko, Adolph Gottlieb, and Barnett Newman. A man of few words, he was said to have frequently quipped, “Why talk when you can paint?”

George Grosz
German, 1893–1959
Follow

Draftsman and painter George Grosz is known for his caustic pen-and-ink caricatures of Weimar Germany. Influenced by Expressionism and Futurism in his early career, he was also strongly affected by his wartime experience and joined Berlin's Dada movement in 1918 as a stance of political commitment; he is also associated with the New Objectivity movement (Neue Sachlichkeit). After leaving Germany prior to Hitler's assumption of power, Grosz turned to romanticized nudes, New York cityscapes, and watercolor landscapes in a departure from his earlier social engagement.

Mark Rothko
American, 1903–1970
Follow

Mark Rothko’s search to express profound emotion through painting culminated in his now-signature compositions of richly colored squares filling large canvases, evoking what he referred to as “the sublime.” One of the pioneers of Color Field Painting, Rothko’s abstract arrangements of shapes, ranging from the slightly surreal biomorphic ones in his early works to the dark squares and rectangles in later years, are intended to evoke the metaphysical through viewers’ communion with the canvas in a controlled setting. “I'm not an abstractionist,” he once said. “I'm interested only in expressing basic human emotions: tragedy, ecstasy, doom, and so on.” His “Rothko Chapel Paintings” (1964-1967), 14 wall-sized monochromatic black paintings installed in a non-denominational church in Houston, Texas, represent the realization of Rothko’s desire that his work be viewed in close quarters.

David Smith (1906-1965)
American, 1906–1965
Follow

Abstract Expressionist sculptor and painter David Smith worked as a riveter and welder at automotive factories before devoting himself to art. Interested in the painterly potential of sculpture, he built his works by welding together found objects, machine parts, and forged metal. His style evolved from early Surrealist and Expressionist tendencies (influenced by Pablo Picasso, Russian Constructivism, Piet Mondrian, and Alberto Giacometti's biomorphic forms) to late masterpieces of geometric abstraction. His last work, Cubi XXVII (1965), part of a series of towering stainless steel sculptures meant to be installed outdoors, broke the auction price record for postwar art at Sotheby's in 2005.

Jackson Pollock, ‘2 PIECE SET- "Jackson Pollock", 1949, Invitation Card, Betty Parsons Gallery NYC  & "Watercolor Sculpture", 1949, Group Show Invite’, 1949, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
About the work
VINCE fine arts/ephemera

2-PIECE SET:
1.) "Jackson Pollock-Recent Paintings", 1949, Invitation Card, SECOND SHOW at Betty Parsons Gallery NYC, w/previous owners notes (pencil) of the exhibitions who attended these shows, Jan 24- Feb 12-1949 (verso).

Provenance:
Betty Parsons Gallery, NY
Both pieces from the same owner who attended …

Medium
Print
Signature
Not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Jackson Pollock
American, 1912–1956
Follow

Major Abstract Expressionist Jackson Pollock, dubbed "Jack the Dripper" by Time magazine in 1956, is best known for his large "action" or drip paintings of 1947–52, formed by pouring and manipulating liquid paint atop canvases set on the floor. A wholly original, rule-shattering figure in American art, Pollock inspired Frank Stella, Richard Serra, and the Color Field painters. Pollock's early Surrealist works of personal symbols and abstract figures show the influence of José Clemente Orozco, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Pablo Picasso, Paul Klee, Joan Miró, and Max Ernst, as well as his experiences with Jungian psychotherapy.

Milton Avery
American, 1885–1965
Follow

Depicting everyday scenes of domestic, city, and country life, painter and printmaker Milton Avery favored simplified forms and the flat application of color, inspired by Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso. “I try to construct a picture in which shapes, spaces, [and] colors form a set of unique relationships, independent of any subject matter,” he once said. Avery’s early work incorporated elements of Impressionism, but his smooth planes of color and combination of figuration and abstraction would make him an archetype of American Modernism, prefiguring aspects of Color Field painting by years. Avery was a friend and source of inspiration to artists including Mark Rothko, Adolph Gottlieb, and Barnett Newman. A man of few words, he was said to have frequently quipped, “Why talk when you can paint?”

George Grosz
German, 1893–1959
Follow

Draftsman and painter George Grosz is known for his caustic pen-and-ink caricatures of Weimar Germany. Influenced by Expressionism and Futurism in his early career, he was also strongly affected by his wartime experience and joined Berlin's Dada movement in 1918 as a stance of political commitment; he is also associated with the New Objectivity movement (Neue Sachlichkeit). After leaving Germany prior to Hitler's assumption of power, Grosz turned to romanticized nudes, New York cityscapes, and watercolor landscapes in a departure from his earlier social engagement.

Mark Rothko
American, 1903–1970
Follow

Mark Rothko’s search to express profound emotion through painting culminated in his now-signature compositions of richly colored squares filling large canvases, evoking what he referred to as “the sublime.” One of the pioneers of Color Field Painting, Rothko’s abstract arrangements of shapes, ranging from the slightly surreal biomorphic ones in his early works to the dark squares and rectangles in later years, are intended to evoke the metaphysical through viewers’ communion with the canvas in a controlled setting. “I'm not an abstractionist,” he once said. “I'm interested only in expressing basic human emotions: tragedy, ecstasy, doom, and so on.” His “Rothko Chapel Paintings” (1964-1967), 14 wall-sized monochromatic black paintings installed in a non-denominational church in Houston, Texas, represent the realization of Rothko’s desire that his work be viewed in close quarters.

David Smith (1906-1965)
American, 1906–1965
Follow

Abstract Expressionist sculptor and painter David Smith worked as a riveter and welder at automotive factories before devoting himself to art. Interested in the painterly potential of sculpture, he built his works by welding together found objects, machine parts, and forged metal. His style evolved from early Surrealist and Expressionist tendencies (influenced by Pablo Picasso, Russian Constructivism, Piet Mondrian, and Alberto Giacometti's biomorphic forms) to late masterpieces of geometric abstraction. His last work, Cubi XXVII (1965), part of a series of towering stainless steel sculptures meant to be installed outdoors, broke the auction price record for postwar art at Sotheby's in 2005.

2 PIECE SET- "Jackson Pollock", 1949, Invitation Card, Betty Parsons Gallery NYC & "Watercolor Sculpture", 1949, Group Show Invite, 1949

Silkscreen on card stock
3 3/4 × 9 in
9.5 × 22.9 cm
This is ephemera, an artifact related to the artist.
Contact For Price
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Have a question? Visit our help center.
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
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