M
MOCA
Los Angeles

Number 1, 1949 was made with thinned paint and cans of commercial enamel. For it and other works of this period, Pollock rejected single points of reference and figural representation to create completely abstract all-over compositions.

The Rita and Taft Schreiber Collection, Given in loving memory of her husband, …

Medium
Image rights
© 2012 Artists Rights Society

Major Abstract Expressionist Jackson Pollock, dubbed "Jack the Dripper" by Time magazine in 1956, is best known for his large "action" or drip paintings of 1947–52, formed by pouring and manipulating liquid paint atop canvases set on the floor. A wholly original, rule-shattering figure in American art, Pollock inspired Frank Stella, Richard Serra, and the Color Field painters. Pollock's early Surrealist works of personal symbols and abstract figures show the influence of José Clemente Orozco, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Pablo Picasso, Paul Klee, Joan Miró, and Max Ernst, as well as his experiences with Jungian psychotherapy.

Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) , Anderson Collection at Stanford University
Selected exhibitions
2018
Staging Jackson PollockWhitechapel Gallery
2016
The Figurative PollockKunstmuseum Basel
2015
Jackson Pollock: Blind SpotsTate Liverpool
View all

Number 1, 1949, 1949

Enamel and metallic paint on canvas
63 × 102 in
160 × 259.1 cm
Location
Los Angeles
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M
MOCA
Los Angeles

Number 1, 1949 was made with thinned paint and cans of commercial enamel. For it and other works of …

Medium
Image rights
© 2012 Artists Rights Society

Major Abstract Expressionist Jackson Pollock, dubbed "Jack the Dripper" by Time magazine in 1956, is best known for his large "action" or drip paintings of 1947–52, formed by pouring and manipulating liquid paint atop canvases set on the floor. A wholly original, rule-shattering figure in American art, Pollock inspired Frank Stella, Richard Serra, and the Color Field painters. Pollock's early Surrealist works of personal symbols and abstract figures show the influence of José Clemente Orozco, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Pablo Picasso, Paul Klee, Joan Miró, and Max Ernst, as well as his experiences with Jungian psychotherapy.

Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) , Anderson Collection at Stanford University
Selected exhibitions (3)
More from this series
View series
Other works by Jackson Pollock
Other works from MOCA
Related works