Jacques Callot, ‘Le Bohémiens, série appelée aussi Les Égyptiens, La Marche des Bohémiens, La Vie Errante des Bohémiens, Les Marches Égyptiennes’, circa 1621-1631, Forum Auctions
Jacques Callot, ‘Le Bohémiens, série appelée aussi Les Égyptiens, La Marche des Bohémiens, La Vie Errante des Bohémiens, Les Marches Égyptiennes’, circa 1621-1631, Forum Auctions
Jacques Callot, ‘Le Bohémiens, série appelée aussi Les Égyptiens, La Marche des Bohémiens, La Vie Errante des Bohémiens, Les Marches Égyptiennes’, circa 1621-1631, Forum Auctions
Jacques Callot, ‘Le Bohémiens, série appelée aussi Les Égyptiens, La Marche des Bohémiens, La Vie Errante des Bohémiens, Les Marches Égyptiennes’, circa 1621-1631, Forum Auctions

Heightened with white, some oxidation to pigment, traces of black chalk, no watermark visible, unframed.

From the Catalogue
The Louvre holds a preparatory drawing (see INV 3863, recto), which appears to be the source for the present work, as opposed to the cartoon on display in the Victoria & Albert. Yet, there are notable differences in the composition between the two drawings, such as the inclusion of the fishing boat to the right hand side, which is not found in the Louvre sheet. For another variant drawing of the same composition, with an attribution to Raphael, see the Archdiocesan Museum, Katowice, Poland.

In private correspondence dated 1957, the present owner's father received a reply from John Gere, at the time still Assistant Keeper of the British Museum, in which prior to showing it to Philip Pouncey, Gere makes a tentative suggestion that the work 'may possibly be a product of Raphael's workshop'. An interesting comparative work can be found in the pen and ink study of The Miraculous Draft of Fishes, held in the Royal Collection, Windsor (see RCIN 912749), where the drawing is described as being by the School of Raphael, with old attributions to both Raphael himself, and his contemporary Giovanni Francesco Penni (1496-c. 1536).
—Courtesy of Forum Auctions

Lieure 374-377

About Jacques Callot

One of the first artists to focus solely on the graphic arts, Jacques Callot produced drawings and etchings that drew influence from Flemish art and Mannerist works in Roman churches. Callot’s career began in Florence in 1612 when he started work in the Medici court, where he was employed to make pictorial records of entertainments such as fairs and festivals, and where he also drew and etched courtiers, beggars, and other characters, excelling particularly at caricatures. Returning to his native France in the latter end of his career, Callot’s work became markedly more sober as he documented the horrors of the Thirty Years’ War in his “Miseries of War” series, which would continue to influence the artistic representation of conflict social injustice into the 19th and 20th centuries.

French, 1592-1635, Nancy, France, based in Nancy, France