Jacques Herzog, ‘Stool/Side Table, Germany’, 2000s, Rago
Jacques Herzog, ‘Stool/Side Table, Germany’, 2000s, Rago
Jacques Herzog, ‘Stool/Side Table, Germany’, 2000s, Rago
Jacques Herzog, ‘Stool/Side Table, Germany’, 2000s, Rago

About Jacques Herzog

Architect Jacques Herzog is the founder and senior partner, along with Pierre de Meuron, of the Pritzker Prize-winning Switzerland-based architecture firm, Herzog & de Meuron. Arguably best known for their conversion of a disused power station into London’s Tate Modern art museum (1995–2000), the firm has completed numerous highly acclaimed projects worldwide. Herzog & de Meuron buildings are sensitively conceived minimalist structures that employ innovative construction methods and surface treatments. A library for the Eberswalde Technical University (1999) in Germany features acid-etched concrete and glass panels silkscreened with images selected by the artist Thomas Ruff. The Dominus Winery (1996–98) in Napa, California has a similarly unconventional design; the walls are built from loose stones contained within a wire mesh cage. In addition to his work as an architect, Herzog is a professor at the Swiss Federal Polytechnic, and he has been a visiting professor at Harvard University for several years.

Swiss, b. 1950, Basel, Switzerland, based in Basel, Switzerland