James Rosenquist, ‘Circles of Confusion (from 11 Pop Artists, Vol I)’, 1965, Alpha 137 Gallery
James Rosenquist, ‘Circles of Confusion (from 11 Pop Artists, Vol I)’, 1965, Alpha 137 Gallery
James Rosenquist, ‘Circles of Confusion (from 11 Pop Artists, Vol I)’, 1965, Alpha 137 Gallery
James Rosenquist, ‘Circles of Confusion (from 11 Pop Artists, Vol I)’, 1965, Alpha 137 Gallery
James Rosenquist, ‘Circles of Confusion (from 11 Pop Artists, Vol I)’, 1965, Alpha 137 Gallery

Signed and dated lower right; numbered lower left in pencil
James Rosenquist's classic screenprint Circles of Confusion uses a pattern of General Electric logos throughout as a kind of flashpoint, as the image goes in and out of focus. In an interview, Rosenquist described the work as follows: "Circles of confusion happen if you take the camera lens and point it at the light. You get a refraction in the camera lens which produces round balls called 'circles of confusion.' Sometimes you see them in a movie, when the camera hits the sun. But I also thought of that politically." -- Ironically "Circles of Confusion" is perhaps more apt today than at any time in our history!

This print from one of the most desirable eras in Pop Art has become quite scarce, as so many impressions are already held in major institutional collections around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; and Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Rosenquist's "Circles of Confusion" was created for the Portfolio 11 Pop Artists, Volume I - which also contained works by Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Tom Wesselmann, James Rosenquist, Jim Dine, Gerald Laing, and others.

The work is elegantly floated and framed in a white wooden frame.
Published by: Original Editions, New York
Printed by: Knickerbocker Machine & Foundry, New York

Please check out our other contemporary art works on Artsy:
https://www.artsy.net/alpha-137-gallery/works

Signature: Signed and dated lower right; numbered lower left in pencil.

About James Rosenquist

Leading Pop artist James Rosenquist—who came to prominence among New York School figures like Roy Lichtenstein, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Willem de Kooning—is well known for his large-scale, fragmented works that bring the visual language of commercial painting onto canvas (notably, from 1957-60, Rosenquist earned his living as a billboard painter). In his use of mass-produced goods and vernacular culture rendered in an anonymous style, Rosenquist's work recalls that of Andy Warhol, while his seemingly irrational, mysterious pictorial combinations owe a debt to Surrealism. His breakthrough work, the iconic F-111 (1965)—51 panels that total over 22 by 24 feet—juxtaposes an American fighter plane with a Firestone tire, garish orange tinned spaghetti, and a young girl under a hair dryer.

American, 1933-2017, Grand Forks, North Dakota, based in Aripeka, Florida

Exhibition Highlights

2015
Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, 
Paris-Pantin,
2015
DeChant Art Consulting, 
Bratenahl,
From an Art Consultant's Eye