James Rosenquist, ‘NEW YORK SAYS IT: NEW YORK THE COMMUNICATION CENTER’, 1983, Alpha 137 Gallery
James Rosenquist, ‘NEW YORK SAYS IT: NEW YORK THE COMMUNICATION CENTER’, 1983, Alpha 137 Gallery
James Rosenquist, ‘NEW YORK SAYS IT: NEW YORK THE COMMUNICATION CENTER’, 1983, Alpha 137 Gallery
James Rosenquist, ‘NEW YORK SAYS IT: NEW YORK THE COMMUNICATION CENTER’, 1983, Alpha 137 Gallery

This iconic multi colored silkscreen and lithograph from the early Eighties is by James Rosenquist is entitled "New York Says It", and the imagery depicts New York as the communications center of the world. It was created as part of the legendary New York, New York Portfolio of 1983 where leading artists were commissioned to create works that celebrate the city.
It is hand signed and numbered in pencil lower left from the edition of 250. "NEW YORK THE COMMUNICATIONS CENTER", ALSO CALLED, "NEW YORK SAYS IT" is part of the legendary "New York, New York" portfolio -- a celebration of New York's cultural life, which featured lithographs by Robert Rauschenberg, Robert Indiana, Larry Rivers, Robert Motherwell, R.B. Kitaj, James Rosenquist and Red Grooms. Wrote famed curator Henry Geldzahler (former NYC Commissioner of Cultural Affairs) on the colophon page: "There are so many satisfying and thrilling aspects to New York City's kaleidoscopic cultural life that it should not be surprising to find eight well known artists have captured much of the rhythm, diversity and essence of the City.." More specifically, Geldzahler writes of Rosenquist's classic piece: "New York the Communications Center is perhaps, surprisingly, the most 'abstract' of these evocations of New York. How is it that a 'Pop' artist presents us with an abstract image? Easily explained: our categories are stale; Rosenquist has moved on. Abstraction now seems less removed from direct and specific communication between artist and viewer. We have, by admitting complexity and paradox, disarranged the neat pigeonholes; the American artist today is freer to fly where and as he will."
Printer: Graphics Society and Circle Fine Arts Publisher: Brand X Editions
This work is fully referenced in the catalogue raisonne of James Rosenquist's printed works (Glenn 200).
In original vintage frame. Not examined outside of frame but appears to be in fine condition.
Measurements:
Framed: 31 inches by 36 inches
Sheet: 30.25 inches by 34.25 inches

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Signature: Signed; hand signed and numbered by the artist in pencil, lower left recto (front). With Kew Gallery label on the back of the frame.

Publisher: Printer: Graphics Society and Circle Fine Arts Publisher: Brand X Editions

200, Glenn

Kew Gallery, New York

About James Rosenquist

Leading Pop artist James Rosenquist—who came to prominence among New York School figures like Roy Lichtenstein, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Willem de Kooning—is well known for his large-scale, fragmented works that bring the visual language of commercial painting onto canvas (notably, from 1957-60, Rosenquist earned his living as a billboard painter). In his use of mass-produced goods and vernacular culture rendered in an anonymous style, Rosenquist's work recalls that of Andy Warhol, while his seemingly irrational, mysterious pictorial combinations owe a debt to Surrealism. His breakthrough work, the iconic F-111 (1965)—51 panels that total over 22 by 24 feet—juxtaposes an American fighter plane with a Firestone tire, garish orange tinned spaghetti, and a young girl under a hair dryer.

American, 1933-2017, Grand Forks, North Dakota, based in Aripeka, Florida

Exhibition Highlights

2015
Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, 
Paris-Pantin,
2015
DeChant Art Consulting, 
Bratenahl,
From an Art Consultant's Eye