Heather James Fine Art Gallery Auction

6/15 AP, State II

Medium
Signature
Signed lower right, "Rosenquist 1978" and editioned lower left, "6/15 AP Other Great Cities, 2 State"

Leading Pop artist James Rosenquist—who came to prominence among New York School figures like Roy Lichtenstein, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Willem de Kooning—is well known for his large-scale, fragmented works that bring the visual language of commercial painting onto canvas (notably, from 1957-60, Rosenquist earned his living as a billboard painter). In his use of mass-produced goods and vernacular culture rendered in an anonymous style, Rosenquist's work recalls that of Andy Warhol, while his seemingly irrational, mysterious pictorial combinations owe a debt to Surrealism. His breakthrough work, the iconic F-111 (1965)—51 panels that total over 22 by 24 feet—juxtaposes an American fighter plane with a Firestone tire, garish orange tinned spaghetti, and a young girl under a hair dryer.

High auction record
$3m, Sotheby's, 2014
Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2018
James Rosenquist: His American LifeAcquavella Galleries
2017
James Rosenquist Painting as ImmersionMuseum Ludwig
2015
International PopWalker Art Center
View all

Other Great Cities, 1978

Lithograph
22 1/2 × 39 1/2 in
57.2 × 100.3 cm
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
Heather James Fine Art Gallery Auction

6/15 AP, State II

Medium
Signature
Signed lower right, "Rosenquist 1978" and editioned lower left, "6/15 AP Other Great Cities, 2 State"

Leading Pop artist James Rosenquist—who came to prominence among New York School figures like Roy Lichtenstein, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Willem de Kooning—is well known for his large-scale, fragmented works that bring the visual language of commercial painting onto canvas (notably, from 1957-60, Rosenquist earned his living as a billboard painter). In his use of mass-produced goods and vernacular culture rendered in an anonymous style, Rosenquist's work recalls that of Andy Warhol, while his seemingly irrational, mysterious pictorial combinations owe a debt to Surrealism. His breakthrough work, the iconic F-111 (1965)—51 panels that total over 22 by 24 feet—juxtaposes an American fighter plane with a Firestone tire, garish orange tinned spaghetti, and a young girl under a hair dryer.

High auction record
$3m, Sotheby's, 2014
Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

Series by this artist

Other works by James Rosenquist