James Verbicky, ‘Cranes Son Ten 11’, 2017, Jennifer Kostuik Gallery
James Verbicky, ‘Cranes Son Ten 11’, 2017, Jennifer Kostuik Gallery
James Verbicky, ‘Cranes Son Ten 11’, 2017, Jennifer Kostuik Gallery

In 2010, Canadian born, California resident James Verbicky pioneered the “Citta Samtana” series (sanskrit words which
translate loosely into “mental continuum” or mindstream). Themed around our current world of media and branding
and its attempts to persuade, manipulate, and coerce through subtle and suggestive imagery, Verbicky’s series present three-dimensional surfaces that transcend traditional painting and venture into the realm of sculpture, utilizing vintage media, graphics, advertisements and obsolete branding materials. Using acrylic paint, panel and resin (with some works employing LEDs), his abstraction attempts to capture both forgotten and persisting icons of media, reminding the viewer that we are constantly being influenced with, and by, media. With pristine attention to every detail of construction, Verbicky employs bold color combinations and elegantly smooth compositions that gleam under natural light. In 2016, Verbicky’s new Bhavanga Series transferred his wall mural technique onto canvas; presenting hand painted and stenciled works, that include the use of crystalina (“diamond dust”),
in his signature horizontal bands. Verbicky has also absorbed multiple West Coast surf and music cultural influences into his
work. His extensive experience as a DJ is also reflected in the work, resonating visually via the overlapping and intersecting
visual “tracks” that he utilizes in the construction of his profoundly complex image structures. The recursive, opulent element demonstrated by the artist is illuminating in fact, reminding us of the most accurate descriptions of the Baroque sensibility: movement imported into mass; dynamic composition with exaggerated motion; clarity of abundant detail producing dramatic tension and exuberance; intense overload and a sense of overwhelmingly immersive sensual experience.

Series: Citta Samtana

Signature: Yes

Image rights: James Verbicky and Kostuik Gallery

2017

  • Sotheby’s, Waterkeeper Alliance, New York City, New York
  • Kostuik Gallery, Vancouver Canada
  • Madison Gallery, La Jolla, CA

  • Joanne Artman Gallery, Laguna Beach, California

2016

  • Gilman Contemporary, Sun Valley, Idaho
  • Joanne Artman Gallery, Laguna Beach, California
  • Quinientos Cincuenta, Mexico City, Mexico

2015


  • Coral Springs Museum, Coral Springs, FL
  • Art of Elysium Fundraising Auction / Sothebys Auction House
  • Laura Rathe Fine Art / Dallas, TX | 2-Man Show

  • Joanne Artman Gallery / Laguna Beach, CA / Solo

  • Madison Gallery / La Jolla, CA / Solo

  • DTR Modern / Boston, MA / 2-Man


    2014

  • Art Silicon Valley / Joanne Artman Gallery

  • ArtAspen / Forre Fine Art

  • Joanne Artman Gallery, Laguna Beach, CA, Solo Exhibition, 'Divisonaire'

  • Madison Gallery, La Jolla, CA, Solo Exhibition, 'Mode Selector'

  • DTR Modern Washington D.C., 2-Man Show

  • DTR Modern, Boston, MA: 2-Man Show
* Dallas Art Fair, Madison Gallery, Dallas, TX

  • Laguna Art Museum Fundraising Auction, Laguna Beach, CA
  • Scope / Art Basel / Forre Fine Art, Miami, FL

  • Texas Contemporary Art Fair / Laura Rathe Fine Art, TX
    
* Houston Fine Art Fair / Laura Rathe Fine Art, Houston, TX

2013


  • Joanne Artman Gallery, Laguna Beach, CA: Solo

  • DTR Modern, Boston, MA: 2-Man Show

  • Madison Gallery, La Jolla, CA / Solo, ERA

  • Palm Springs Fine Art Fair, Madison Gallery

  • Art of Elysium Charity Auction / Christie's Auction House

Canadian, b. 1973 Edmonton, Canada, resides in Southern California

About James Verbicky

James Verbicky is renowned for what he calls “media paintings”, large sculptural assemblages of Baltic birch wood covered in vintage advertisements for popular brands and imagery from foreign magazines bought along the Seine in Paris. He arranges the layers of paper in a horizontal grid, paying homage to pioneering Modernists and Minimalists such as Piet Mondrian, Kenneth Noland, and Morris Louis. A resin topcoat renders the surface shiny and the paper transparent, so that the images on the backsides bleed through to the front, creating a sense of depth. Paying attention to what is behind each piece of paper “makes the collage more interesting and creates a certain mood,” he says. Verbicky’s collages, which can be “read” in any direction, evoke familiar scenes and subjects, from flowers in bloom, to a racetrack blurred in action, to stock tickers scrolling across a television screen.

Canadian, b. 1973