Jan De Cock, ‘Nature morte’, 2013, Deweer Gallery

All sculptures from the magnificent ‘Everything for you , Otegem’ - exhibition Belgian artist Jan De Cock especially created for the gallery in the summer of 2013 - under the general heading Nature Morte - are composed of different architectural objects, referring to modernist sculpture and painting and their histories and the rising tensions between economics and art.
In his exhibition review published in the leading American art magazine Artforum (January 2014) art critic Wouter Davidts describes the sculptures as follows: “The largest gallery contained a grid of sixty-eight singular sculptures composed from a concise set of recurring elements, plus seven others scattered off the grid; each is titled Nature Morte followed by a number or additional description and dated 2013. The works are geometric volumes stacked on wooden bases, some of which are propped up by bags of couscous and garnished with other food items; amorphous compositions of terra-cotta pots and bottles top the constructions. Cheap jewelry, fake plants and other throwaway commodities serve as frivolous embellishment. Finally, a golden door chain connects the base and the top of every structure”.

Jan De Cock - Everything for you , Otegem, Deweer Gallery, Otegem, BE, 2013

About Jan De Cock

Jan De Cock borrows a film vocabulary in discussing his photography and installation works—particularly durée (passage of time) and mise-en-scène (staging for a camera), for describing the way his pieces frame and tell stories. De Cock commonly photographs landscapes and architecture, then displays the images as single frames of a larger sequence in conjunction with archival images, furniture, or architectural constructions made of plywood. As part of his interest in constructing historical narratives, he publishes artist’s books as indexes for his projects. De Cock’s compositions have a stripped-down quality that variously references Piet Mondrian’s paintings and Umberto Boccioni’s Futurist sculptures. “To me, Modernism is the most important period in art history,” he once said. “Dare I say that Post-Modernism did not exist?”

Belgian, b. 1976, Brussels, Belgium, based in Brussels, Belgium