Jasper Johns, ‘Jasper Johns- FIRST ONE MAN SHOW REVIEW, Leo Castelli Gallery, Review by Robert Rosenblum, ARTS Magazine (Arts Digest),’, Jan. 1958, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
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Jasper Johns- FIRST ONE MAN SHOW REVIEW, Leo Castelli Gallery, Review by Robert Rosenblum, ARTS Magazine (Arts Digest),, Jan. 1958

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14 × 10 in
35.6 × 25.4 cm
.
$1,000
Ships from MIAMI, FL, US
Shipping: $25 domestic, $45 rest of world
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About the work
Provenance
VINCE fine arts/ephemera

Jasper Johns- FIRST ONE-MAN SHOW REVIEW, 1958, ARTS Magazine (Arts Digest), Review by Robert …

Medium
Signature
Not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
ARTS Magazine (Arts Digest)
Jasper Johns
American, b. 1930
Follow

Jasper Johns's ongoing stylistic and technical experimentation place him at the forefront of American art. His richly textured paintings of maps, flags, numbers, and targets laid the groundwork for Pop art, Minimalism, and Conceptual art. In New York in the 1950s, Johns was part of a community of artists, including Robert Rauschenberg, seeking an alternative to the emotional nature of Abstract Expressionism. Influenced by Marcel Duchamp, Johns's early work paired the concerns of craft with familiar concrete imagery. His interest in process also led to innovations in lithography, screen-printing, etching and woodblock, using such materials as pencil, pen, brush, crayon, wax, and plaster to constantly challenge the technical possibilities of printmaking.

Arshile Gorky
Armenian-American, 1904–1948
Follow

Arshile Gorky was one of the last great Surrealist painters and a major influence on (and early figure in) Abstract Expressionism. After emigrating to the U.S. in 1920, he devoted himself to apprenticeships in the style of other artists before developing his own personal vision. Through his friendships with Surrealist André Breton and painter Roberto Matta, he was introduced to automatic drawing and biomorphic imagery. Gorky's innovative, explosive landscapes used an abstract vocabulary to convey memories of his Armenian childhood alongside direct observations of nature.

Andy Warhol
American, 1928–1987
Follow

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

Roy Lichtenstein
American, 1923–1997
Follow

When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.

André Derain
French, 1880–1954
Follow

A founding member of Fauvism, Andre Derain is known for his innovative landscape and cityscape paintings in which he transforms the subject with bold and largely unrealistic colors. Early in his career Derain worked closely with fellow Fauves Maurice de Vlaminck and Henri Matisse, the latter helping convince Derain’s family to let him pursue a career in painting. In Derain’s celebrated depictions of London’s Thames River and Tower Bridge, he applied each color separately in dots or dabs, inviting associations with the Divisionist technique of Paul Signac and Georges Seurat. Derain’s later work features more subtle tones and new subjects, including portraiture and still life. Inspired by his friendship with Pablo Picasso, Derain’s post-Fauve works show an engagement with both classicism and Cubism, and this so called “classical” style earned him widespread recognition throughout Europe and the United States.

Francis Picabia
French, 1879–1953
Follow

During his early career, Francis Picabia painted in the Impressionist style and exhibited at the Paris salons. However, from 1908 on, elements of Fauvism and Neo-Impressionism, as well as Cubism and other modes of abstraction, would appear in his work; he later joined the Puteaux Group, of which Guillaume Apollinaire, Robert Delaunay, and Marcel Duchamp were members. The year 1915 marked the beginning of Picabia’s “machinist” period, during which he produced works inspired by industrial developments, such as Machine turn quickly (1916–18) and his satirical drawing Universal Prostitution (1916), which was intended to take a jab at bourgeois sexuality. While in Barcelona in 1917, Picabia launched a Dada periodical titled 391 after Alfred Stieglitz’s periodical 291, though he eventually denounced Dada and returned to figurative painting. In the ’40s, his practice took a surprising turn as he began to paint nudes in the style of French glamour magazines, as in Femmes au bull-dog (1942). Picabia was a close friend of the famous art collector and writer Gertrude Stein.

Mark Rothko
American, 1903–1970
Follow

Mark Rothko’s search to express profound emotion through painting culminated in his now-signature compositions of richly colored squares filling large canvases, evoking what he referred to as “the sublime.” One of the pioneers of Color Field Painting, Rothko’s abstract arrangements of shapes, ranging from the slightly surreal biomorphic ones in his early works to the dark squares and rectangles in later years, are intended to evoke the metaphysical through viewers’ communion with the canvas in a controlled setting. “I'm not an abstractionist,” he once said. “I'm interested only in expressing basic human emotions: tragedy, ecstasy, doom, and so on.” His “Rothko Chapel Paintings” (1964-1967), 14 wall-sized monochromatic black paintings installed in a non-denominational church in Houston, Texas, represent the realization of Rothko’s desire that his work be viewed in close quarters.

Josef Albers
German-American, 1888–1976
Follow

Josef Albers is best known for his seminal “Homage to the Square” series of the 1950s and '60s, which focused on the simplification of form and the interplay of shape and color. “Abstraction is real, probably more real than nature,” he once said. “I prefer to see with closed eyes.” His abstract canvases employed rigid geometric compositions in order to emphasize the optical effects set off by his chosen color palettes. Albers was highly influential as a teacher, first at the Bauhaus in Germany alongside Wassily Kandinsky and Paul Klee, and later with posts at Black Mountain College, Yale, and Harvard; he taught courses in design and color theory, and counted among his students such iconic artists as Eva Hesse, Cy Twombly, Richard Anuszkiewicz, and Robert Rauschenberg. He is often cited among the progenitors of Minimalist, Conceptual, and Op art.

Louise Nevelson
American, 1899–1988
Follow

Louise Nevelson’s room-sized wood sculptures have been hailed as emblematic of many different movements, including Abstract Expressionism, Cubism, and Surrealism. Monochromatic and usually black, with isolated departures into white and gold, Nevelson assembled the sculptures using discarded pieces of wood that she received or found on the street. As part of Nevelson’s massive, commanding works of art, the scrap wood takes on majestic proportions, reflecting the artist’s personal story of dislocation and self-invention. In Mrs. N’s Palace (1964-1977), a 20-foot-wide tomb-like sculpture with a hollow interior, mirrored floor, and artifacts from her life, Nevelson provides a glimpse into her own physical and personal history.

Helen Frankenthaler
American, 1928–2011
Follow

A second-generation Abstract Expressionist painter, Helen Frankenthaler became active in the New York School of the 1950s, initially influenced by artists like Arshile Gorky, Willem de Kooning, and Jackson Pollock. She gained fame with her invention of the color-stain technique—applying thin washes of paint to unprimed canvas—in her iconic Mountains and Sea (1952), a motivating work for Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland, and other Color Field painters who emerged in the ’60s. Her own canvases, however, often evoked elements of landscape or figuration in the shaping of their forms. “My pictures are full of climates, abstract climates,” she once said. “They're not nature per se, but a feeling.” From 1958 to 1971, she was married to fellow Abstract Expressionist Robert Motherwell, who, like Frankenthaler, worked in symbolic painted gestures—only her paintings were almost always visibly improvised from start to finish. As poet and critic Frank O’Hara wrote in 1960, “she is willing to risk everything on inspiration.” In addition to painting, Frankenthaler also made ceramics, welded steel sculptures, and set designs, but the related medium that most attracted her, and in which her achievement came the closest painting, was printmaking—especially the creation of woodcuts, hers counting among the greatest of contemporary works in that medium.

Jasper Johns, ‘Jasper Johns- FIRST ONE MAN SHOW REVIEW, Leo Castelli Gallery, Review by Robert Rosenblum, ARTS Magazine (Arts Digest),’, Jan. 1958, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
About the work
Provenance
VINCE fine arts/ephemera

Jasper Johns- FIRST ONE-MAN SHOW REVIEW, 1958, ARTS Magazine (Arts Digest), Review by Robert Rosenblum (art critic), Exhibition at The Leo Castelli Gallery NYC (4 E. 77), Jan. 13-Feb. 1,
with Articles & Reviews-
Josef Albers
André Derain
Helen Frankenthaler
Arshile Gorky
Louise Nevelson
Francis Picabia
Mark Rothko

Medium
Signature
Not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
ARTS Magazine (Arts Digest)
Jasper Johns
American, b. 1930
Follow

Jasper Johns's ongoing stylistic and technical experimentation place him at the forefront of American art. His richly textured paintings of maps, flags, numbers, and targets laid the groundwork for Pop art, Minimalism, and Conceptual art. In New York in the 1950s, Johns was part of a community of artists, including Robert Rauschenberg, seeking an alternative to the emotional nature of Abstract Expressionism. Influenced by Marcel Duchamp, Johns's early work paired the concerns of craft with familiar concrete imagery. His interest in process also led to innovations in lithography, screen-printing, etching and woodblock, using such materials as pencil, pen, brush, crayon, wax, and plaster to constantly challenge the technical possibilities of printmaking.

Arshile Gorky
Armenian-American, 1904–1948
Follow

Arshile Gorky was one of the last great Surrealist painters and a major influence on (and early figure in) Abstract Expressionism. After emigrating to the U.S. in 1920, he devoted himself to apprenticeships in the style of other artists before developing his own personal vision. Through his friendships with Surrealist André Breton and painter Roberto Matta, he was introduced to automatic drawing and biomorphic imagery. Gorky's innovative, explosive landscapes used an abstract vocabulary to convey memories of his Armenian childhood alongside direct observations of nature.

Andy Warhol
American, 1928–1987
Follow

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

Roy Lichtenstein
American, 1923–1997
Follow

When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.

André Derain
French, 1880–1954
Follow

A founding member of Fauvism, Andre Derain is known for his innovative landscape and cityscape paintings in which he transforms the subject with bold and largely unrealistic colors. Early in his career Derain worked closely with fellow Fauves Maurice de Vlaminck and Henri Matisse, the latter helping convince Derain’s family to let him pursue a career in painting. In Derain’s celebrated depictions of London’s Thames River and Tower Bridge, he applied each color separately in dots or dabs, inviting associations with the Divisionist technique of Paul Signac and Georges Seurat. Derain’s later work features more subtle tones and new subjects, including portraiture and still life. Inspired by his friendship with Pablo Picasso, Derain’s post-Fauve works show an engagement with both classicism and Cubism, and this so called “classical” style earned him widespread recognition throughout Europe and the United States.

Francis Picabia
French, 1879–1953
Follow

During his early career, Francis Picabia painted in the Impressionist style and exhibited at the Paris salons. However, from 1908 on, elements of Fauvism and Neo-Impressionism, as well as Cubism and other modes of abstraction, would appear in his work; he later joined the Puteaux Group, of which Guillaume Apollinaire, Robert Delaunay, and Marcel Duchamp were members. The year 1915 marked the beginning of Picabia’s “machinist” period, during which he produced works inspired by industrial developments, such as Machine turn quickly (1916–18) and his satirical drawing Universal Prostitution (1916), which was intended to take a jab at bourgeois sexuality. While in Barcelona in 1917, Picabia launched a Dada periodical titled 391 after Alfred Stieglitz’s periodical 291, though he eventually denounced Dada and returned to figurative painting. In the ’40s, his practice took a surprising turn as he began to paint nudes in the style of French glamour magazines, as in Femmes au bull-dog (1942). Picabia was a close friend of the famous art collector and writer Gertrude Stein.

Mark Rothko
American, 1903–1970
Follow

Mark Rothko’s search to express profound emotion through painting culminated in his now-signature compositions of richly colored squares filling large canvases, evoking what he referred to as “the sublime.” One of the pioneers of Color Field Painting, Rothko’s abstract arrangements of shapes, ranging from the slightly surreal biomorphic ones in his early works to the dark squares and rectangles in later years, are intended to evoke the metaphysical through viewers’ communion with the canvas in a controlled setting. “I'm not an abstractionist,” he once said. “I'm interested only in expressing basic human emotions: tragedy, ecstasy, doom, and so on.” His “Rothko Chapel Paintings” (1964-1967), 14 wall-sized monochromatic black paintings installed in a non-denominational church in Houston, Texas, represent the realization of Rothko’s desire that his work be viewed in close quarters.

Josef Albers
German-American, 1888–1976
Follow

Josef Albers is best known for his seminal “Homage to the Square” series of the 1950s and '60s, which focused on the simplification of form and the interplay of shape and color. “Abstraction is real, probably more real than nature,” he once said. “I prefer to see with closed eyes.” His abstract canvases employed rigid geometric compositions in order to emphasize the optical effects set off by his chosen color palettes. Albers was highly influential as a teacher, first at the Bauhaus in Germany alongside Wassily Kandinsky and Paul Klee, and later with posts at Black Mountain College, Yale, and Harvard; he taught courses in design and color theory, and counted among his students such iconic artists as Eva Hesse, Cy Twombly, Richard Anuszkiewicz, and Robert Rauschenberg. He is often cited among the progenitors of Minimalist, Conceptual, and Op art.

Louise Nevelson
American, 1899–1988
Follow

Louise Nevelson’s room-sized wood sculptures have been hailed as emblematic of many different movements, including Abstract Expressionism, Cubism, and Surrealism. Monochromatic and usually black, with isolated departures into white and gold, Nevelson assembled the sculptures using discarded pieces of wood that she received or found on the street. As part of Nevelson’s massive, commanding works of art, the scrap wood takes on majestic proportions, reflecting the artist’s personal story of dislocation and self-invention. In Mrs. N’s Palace (1964-1977), a 20-foot-wide tomb-like sculpture with a hollow interior, mirrored floor, and artifacts from her life, Nevelson provides a glimpse into her own physical and personal history.

Helen Frankenthaler
American, 1928–2011
Follow

A second-generation Abstract Expressionist painter, Helen Frankenthaler became active in the New York School of the 1950s, initially influenced by artists like Arshile Gorky, Willem de Kooning, and Jackson Pollock. She gained fame with her invention of the color-stain technique—applying thin washes of paint to unprimed canvas—in her iconic Mountains and Sea (1952), a motivating work for Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland, and other Color Field painters who emerged in the ’60s. Her own canvases, however, often evoked elements of landscape or figuration in the shaping of their forms. “My pictures are full of climates, abstract climates,” she once said. “They're not nature per se, but a feeling.” From 1958 to 1971, she was married to fellow Abstract Expressionist Robert Motherwell, who, like Frankenthaler, worked in symbolic painted gestures—only her paintings were almost always visibly improvised from start to finish. As poet and critic Frank O’Hara wrote in 1960, “she is willing to risk everything on inspiration.” In addition to painting, Frankenthaler also made ceramics, welded steel sculptures, and set designs, but the related medium that most attracted her, and in which her achievement came the closest painting, was printmaking—especially the creation of woodcuts, hers counting among the greatest of contemporary works in that medium.

Jasper Johns- FIRST ONE MAN SHOW REVIEW, Leo Castelli Gallery, Review by Robert Rosenblum, ARTS Magazine (Arts Digest),, Jan. 1958

Print
14 × 10 in
35.6 × 25.4 cm
.
$1,000
Ships from MIAMI, FL, US
Shipping: $25 domestic, $45 rest of world
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Locked
Secure payment
Secure transactions by credit card through Stripe.
Learn more.
Have a question? Visit our help center.
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
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