Jean-Michel Basquiat, ‘"Complimentary Ticket", ART AREA Club NYC’, 1985, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Jean-Michel Basquiat, ‘"Complimentary Ticket", ART AREA Club NYC’, 1985, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Jean-Michel Basquiat, ‘"Complimentary Ticket", ART AREA Club NYC’, 1985, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Jean-Michel Basquiat, ‘"Complimentary Ticket", ART AREA Club NYC’, 1985, VINCE fine arts/ephemera

The Complimentary version was for friends most flyers advertised were for $15 admission. This was the 1980’s answer to the 1951 photograph of “The Irascibles” appearing in Life magazine, Michael Halsband’s decade-defining image of New York artists is printed here in its original reception context: a vintage invitation to the nightclub, Area, on May 8, 1985. Area was recently chronicled by the New York Times as “the nightclub-as-art-gallery that came to define the creative hedonism of 1980s New York.” Apart from this, Basquiat, wearing a bow-tie in the group portrait, wryly marks his own place within the matrix of race, class, and power in the 1980s artworld: as the only black man in the photo, he holds a plate, posing as a server. Printed in an unknown edition size. Every picture tells a story. These pieces are Extremely RARE, and are historical piece from the NYC 1980's Art Seen.
Condition:
Complimentary version- Near Mint (see pics)

Signature: Not signed

Publisher: Area Club NYC

Private Collection, NY
Hemphill Collection, NY

About Jean-Michel Basquiat

A poet, musician, and graffiti prodigy in late-1970s New York, Jean-Michel Basquiat had honed his signature painting style of obsessive scribbling, elusive symbols and diagrams, and mask-and-skull imagery by the time he was 20. “I don’t think about art while I work,” he once said. “I think about life.” Basquiat drew his subjects from his own Caribbean heritage—his father was Haitian and his mother of Puerto Rican descent—and a convergence of African-American, African, and Aztec cultural histories with Classical themes and contemporary heroes like athletes and musicians. Often associated with Neo-expressionism, Basquiat received massive acclaim in only a few short years, showing alongside artists like Julian Schnabel, David Salle, and Francesco Clemente. In 1983, he met Andy Warhol, who would come to be a mentor and idol. The two collaborated on a series of paintings before Warhol’s death in 1987, followed by Basquiat’s own untimely passing a year later.

American, 1960-1988, New York, New York, based in New York, New York

About Andy Warhol

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

American, 1928-1987, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, based in New York, New York

About Julian Schnabel

Filmmaker and Neo-expressionist artist Julian Schnabel’s large-scale paintings are materially and thematically monumental, drawing on a wealth of influences from Cubism to the practice of Cy Twombly and themes such as sexuality, obsession, suffering, redemption, death, and belief. Crowded with paint drips, dynamic brushstrokes, and found materials including broken plates, textiles, tarpaulins, and velvet, many of Schnabel’s paintings combine painting and collage techniques. Of his many portraits, perhaps the best known is the oil on velvet Portrait of Andy Warhol (1982), in which the almost translucent subject shares the canvas with a Pollock-esque splatter of paint.

American, b. 1951, Brooklyn, New York, based in New York, New York

About Francesco Clemente

Italian painter Francesco Clemente came to prominence in the mid-1970s with vivid paintings rife with erotic imagery of mutilated body parts, gesturing amorphous figures often depicted in rich colors, as well as a series of contorted self-portraits. Fascinated with Indian art and mysticism, his gouache paintings and pastel drawings are especially noted for their intense and arcane quasi-religious content that has grown increasingly surreal in his later works. Though large in scale, Clemente’s work often conveys an uncanny and unabashed intimacy. Involved in the revolt against formalism and the detached qualities of much Conceptual Art, Clemente has been compared to such painters as Georg Baselitz and David Salle.

Italian, b. 1952, Naples, Italy, based in New York, NY; Rome, Italy; Madras, India

About Jenny Holzer

Jenny Holzer’s truisms, such as “Abuse of power comes as no surprise” and “Protect me from what I want,” have appeared on posters, billboards, and even condoms, and as LED signs and monumental light projections. Whether questioning consumerism, describing torture, or lamenting death and disease, her use of language (sometimes mistaken for advertising when installed in public spaces) is designed to agitate and disturb. Holzer’s recent work ranges from silk-screened paintings of declassified government memos to a large-scale poetry and light installation in the lobby of 7 World Trade Center, New York. In 1990, Holzer received the Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale.

American, b. 1950, Gallipolis, Ohio, based in Hoosick Falls, New York

Exhibition Highlights

2016
New York,
Artworks

About Larry Rivers

Painter, sculptor, poet, and musician Larry Rivers was an established figure in the New York School, recognized for creating large paintings merging abstract and narrative elements, as in Washington Crossing the Delaware (1953), where the general leads his men through a space defined by murky oil washes and broad gestural brushwork. Rivers studied in the late 1940s under Hans Hofmann, the artist often regarded as the grandfather of Abstract Expressionism, but he never abandoned figuration, his compositions often including human subjects and text, as in Vocabulary Lesson (Polish) (1964). Rivers’ work is often compared to that of postmodern artists Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg, and is considered an important precursor to Pop art. As Andy Warhol once said, “Larry’s painting style was unique—it wasn’t Abstract Expressionism and it wasn’t Pop, it fell into the period in between. But his personality was very Pop.”

American, 1923-2002, Bronx, New York, based in New York, Southampton, New York and Zihuatanejo, Mexico

About David Hockney

A pioneer of the British Pop Art movement in the early 1960s alongside Richard Hamilton, David Hockney gained recognition for his semi-abstract paintings on the theme of homosexual love before it was decriminalized in England in 1967. In We Two Boys Clinging Together (1961), red-painted couples embrace one other while floating amidst fragments from a Walt Whitman poem. After moving to California at the end of 1963, Hockney began painting scenes of the sensual and uninhibited life of athletic young men, depicting swimming pools, palm trees, and perpetual sunshine. Experimenting with photography in the mid-1970s, Hockney went on to create his famous photocollages with Polaroids and snapshot prints arranged in a grid formation, pushing the two-dimensionality of photography to the limit, fragmenting the monocular vision of the camera and activating the viewer in the process. A versatile artist, Hockney has produced work in almost every medium—including full-scale opera set designs, prints, and drawings using cutting-edge technology such as fax machines, laser photocopiers, computers, and even iPhones and iPads.

British, b. 1937, Bradford, United Kingdom, based in Yorkshire, United Kingdom

About Alex Katz

New York School painter Alex Katz developed his highly stylized aesthetic in reaction to 1950s Abstract Expressionism, finding his own distinctive resolution between formalism and representation. His brightly colored figurative and landscape paintings are rendered in a flat style that takes cues from everyday visual culture like advertising and cinema, in many ways anticipating both the formal and conceptual concerns of Pop Art. Well known for his many portraits of his wife and muse, Ada, Katz has also dedicated himself to printmaking and freestanding sculptures of cutout figures painted on wood or aluminum.

American, b. 1927, New York, New York, based in New York, New York

About Marisol

Best known for her elegant, eclectic, and poignant yet edgy figurative sculptures, Marisol (born Maria Sol Escobar) makes art across styles and media. Her output encompasses woodcarving and sculptural assemblages, cast metal pieces, ceramics, and works on paper. Marisol, who is influenced by artists such as Willem de Kooning and Andy Warhol, is often grouped with pop art artists, but her work does not lend itself to neat categorization. Strains of pre-Columbian folk art and religious symbolism infuse her pieces, and her figurative assemblages feature portraits of other artists, political leaders, and movie stars. Marisol also makes recreations of iconic news images and tableaux of families, sometimes her own, crafting sculptural scenes from carved stone, neon, Astroturf, and plywood.

Venezuelan, 1930-2016, Paris, France, based in New York, New York

About Tom Wesselmann

Tom Wesselmann is considered one of the major artists of New York Pop Art, along with Roy Lichtenstein and Andy Warhol. Best known for his 1960s series “Great American Nude,” which featured flat figures in an intense palette of red, white, blue, and other patriotic colors, Wesselmann, in an effort to reject Abstract Expressionism, made collages and assemblages that incorporated everyday objects and advertising ephemera. In the early 1980s, he produced his first "Metal Works,” in which he shaped canvases and cut metal to create abstract three-dimensional images. In his final years, Wesselmann returned to the female form in the “Sunset Nudes” series, where the compositions, abstract imagery, and sanguine moods recall the odalisques of Henri Matisse.

American, 1931-2004, Cincinnati, Ohio, based in New York, New York

Exhibition Highlights

2015
Dallas,
International Pop

About Keith Haring

Bridging the gap between the art world and the street, Keith Haring rose to prominence in the early 1980s with his graffiti drawings made in the subways and on the sidewalks of New York City. Combining the appeal of cartoons with the raw energy of Art Brut artists like Jean DuBuffet, Haring developed a distinct pop-graffiti aesthetic centered on fluid, bold outlines against a dense, rhythmic overspread of imagery like that of babies, barking dogs, flying saucers, hearts, and Mickey Mouse. In his subway drawings and murals, Haring explored themes of exploitation, subjugation, drug abuse, and rising fears of nuclear holocaust, which became increasingly apocalyptic after his AIDS diagnosis. Alongside Jean-Michel Basquiat, Kenny Scharf, and Jenny Holzer, Haring is regarded as a leading figure in New York East Village Art scene in the 1970s and '80s.

American, 1958-1990, Reading, Pennsylvania, based in New York, New York

About Robert Mapplethorpe

In the 1970s, Robert Mapplethorpe and musician, poet, and artist Patti Smith lived together in New York’s infamous Chelsea Hotel where he started shooting Polaroids to use in his collages. Drawn to photography, Mapplethorpe got a Hasselblad medium-format camera and began taking pictures of his friends and acquaintances—artists, musicians, socialites, pornographic film stars, and members of the gay S & M underground. Despite his shocking content, Mapplethorpe was a formalist, interested in composition, color, texture, balance, and, most of all, beauty. In the 1980s, he concentrated on studio photography, specifically nudes, flowers, and formal portraits that are considerably more refined than his earlier work. After Mapplethorpe died from an AIDS-related illness, his work precipitated national controversy when it was included in “The Perfect Moment,” a traveling exhibition funded by the National Endowment for the Arts.

American, 1946-1989, Queens, New York, based in New York, New York

About John Chamberlain

John Chamberlain is best known for his twisting sculptures made from scrap metal and banged up, discarded automobile parts and other industrial detritus. “My work has nothing to do with car wrecks,“ he has said. “I believe common materials are the best materials.” With its emphasis on paint finishes and the raw materials’ lines and seams, his work has been described as a kind of three-dimensional Abstract Expressionist painting. While his breakthrough work dates form the 1960s (namely in sculpture), he has also more recently worked with large-scale photography.

American, 1927-2011, Rochester, Indiana, based in Shelter Island, New York

Exhibition Highlights

2016
New York,
Shrines to Speed Art And The Automobile: From The Minimal To The Postmodern

About Sol LeWitt

One of the leading exponents of Conceptual art, Sol LeWitt stressed the idea behind his work over its execution. “A blind man can make art if what is in his mind can be passed to another mind in some tangible form,” he once said. LeWitt is best known for his large-scale “Wall Drawings,” rigorous arrays of designs, shapes, grids, and colors rendered in pencil and paint in coherence with strict instructions and diagrams to be followed in executing the work. LeWitt made over 1,200 of these works in his career, his visual vocabulary in strong alignment with Minimalism despite his rejection of the movement. His “structures”, as he preferred to call sculptures, were variations on geometric shapes, constructed from steel, polyurethane, or concrete, often featuring stacked cubes without sides. LeWitt is one of the seminal artists of the late 20th and early 21st centuries, influencing artists like Eva Hesse and Frank Stella, among countless others.

American, 1928-2007, Hartford, Connecticut, based in Chester, Connecticut

About Kenny Scharf

Muralist, painter, sculptor, and installation artist Kenny Scharf is best known for his fantastical, large-scale paintings of anthropomorphic animals and imagined creatures, as in Viva Mare Viva Mar (2011). Though Scharf’s brightly colored imagery is generally playful, he has remarked that darker themes exist beneath the surface of his works, visible upon closer inspection. Scharf was a part of the 1980s East Village Art movement, along with his good friend and fellow street artist Keith Haring. The artist says he has been influenced by all 20th-century art movements, including Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art, the latter reflected in his appropriation of cartoon characters from television shows like the Flintstones and Jetsons and his humorous depiction of snack food in Maple Glazed Donut Over Fertile Landscape (2011). Scharf’s oftentimes dense and frenetic compositions also echo a Baroque sensibility.

American, b. 1958, Los Angeles, California

About Jennifer Losch Bartlett

In the course of her 50-year career, Jennifer Bartlett has alternately been considered a painter, a printmaker, and an installation artist, though her iconic works combine these three practices. Bartlett has become known for colorful painting on baked enamel on steel plates, which she then installs in grids. Each plate is both an individual work and a part of a larger piece. She also works with numerous mediums including pencil, ink, conte, oil pastel, gouache, drypoint, aquatint, screen prints, woodcuts, and lithography. Bartlett received her MFA from Yale, where her classmates included Richard Serra, Brice Marden, and Nancy Graves. She was perhaps most influenced by Sol LeWitt’s “Paragraphs on Conceptual Art” at the start of her career.

American, March 14, 1941, Long Beach, California, based in New York, New York