After Jean-Michel Basquiat, ‘Dizzy Gillespie, Porcelain Plate (New in Box) ’, 2014, Alpha 137 Gallery
After Jean-Michel Basquiat, ‘Dizzy Gillespie, Porcelain Plate (New in Box) ’, 2014, Alpha 137 Gallery
After Jean-Michel Basquiat, ‘Dizzy Gillespie, Porcelain Plate (New in Box) ’, 2014, Alpha 137 Gallery

This beautiful Limoges porcelain plate is based on an iconic Basquiat painting. The motifs illustrated on the plate—graffiti, conceptual words, voodoo, and music—are typical of Basquiat's work. The New York born artist, who was deeply influenced by music and formed the experimental rock band Gray, was discovered as a graffiti painter in 1981. Basquiat soon gained international notice and critical acclaim for his visionary fusion of multicultural symbols, scathing social commentary, and frenetic graphic style. It was made in France under the auspices and authorization of the Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat.

The New York-born artist was discovered as a graffiti painter in 1981. Basquiat soon gained international notice and critical acclaim for his visionary fusion of multicultural symbols, scathing social commentary, and frenetic graphic style.
Manufacturer: Ligne Blanche, France, under auspices of the Jean-Michel Basquiat Estate
New in original box; makes a great gift.
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Signature: This plate is in excellent condition and comes in an elegant blue gift box bearing the estate copyright symbol. The plate itself is stamped on the underside with Estate copyright information. (see photograph) New in original box.

Manufacturer: Ligne Blanche, France, under auspices of the Jean-Michel Basquiat Estate

Ligne Blanche, France, under auspices of the Jean-Michel Basquiat Estate

About Jean-Michel Basquiat

A poet, musician, and graffiti prodigy in late-1970s New York, Jean-Michel Basquiat had honed his signature painting style of obsessive scribbling, elusive symbols and diagrams, and mask-and-skull imagery by the time he was 20. “I don’t think about art while I work,” he once said. “I think about life.” Basquiat drew his subjects from his own Caribbean heritage—his father was Haitian and his mother of Puerto Rican descent—and a convergence of African-American, African, and Aztec cultural histories with Classical themes and contemporary heroes like athletes and musicians. Often associated with Neo-expressionism, Basquiat received massive acclaim in only a few short years, showing alongside artists like Julian Schnabel, David Salle, and Francesco Clemente. In 1983, he met Andy Warhol, who would come to be a mentor and idol. The two collaborated on a series of paintings before Warhol’s death in 1987, followed by Basquiat’s own untimely passing a year later.

American, 1960-1988, New York, New York, based in New York, New York