Jean-Michel Basquiat, ‘''Food For The Soup Kitchens'', 1983, Fashion Moda, Exhibition Poster.’, 1983, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
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''Food For The Soup Kitchens'', 1983, Fashion Moda, Exhibition Poster., 1983

Paper, wood/glass frame
17 3/4 × 12 in
45.1 × 30.5 cm
This is ephemera, an artifact related to the artist.
$5,500
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Have a question? Visit our help center.
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About the work
Provenance
VINCE fine arts/ephemera

"Food for the Soup Kitchens", 1983, Fashion Moda, Exhibition Poster,
Offset lithograph on …

Medium
Print
Condition
Excellent- slight age toning (see pics).
Signature
Not signed, not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Included
Publisher
Privately published, 1983
Jean-Michel Basquiat
American, 1960–1988
Follow

A poet, musician, and graffiti prodigy in late-1970s New York, Jean-Michel Basquiat had honed his signature painting style of obsessive scribbling, elusive symbols and diagrams, and mask-and-skull imagery by the time he was 20. “I don’t think about art while I work,” he once said. “I think about life.” Basquiat drew his subjects from his own Caribbean heritage—his father was Haitian and his mother of Puerto Rican descent—and a convergence of African-American, African, and Aztec cultural histories with Classical themes and contemporary heroes like athletes and musicians. Often associated with Neo-expressionism, Basquiat received massive acclaim in only a few short years, showing alongside artists like Julian Schnabel, David Salle, and Francesco Clemente. In 1983, he met Andy Warhol, who would come to be a mentor and idol. The two collaborated on a series of paintings before Warhol’s death in 1987, followed by Basquiat’s own untimely passing a year later.

Keith Haring
American, 1958–1990
Follow

Bridging the gap between the art world and the street, Keith Haring rose to prominence in the early 1980s with his graffiti drawings made in the subways and on the sidewalks of New York City. Combining the appeal of cartoons with the raw energy of Art Brut artists like Jean DuBuffet, Haring developed a distinct pop-graffiti aesthetic centered on fluid, bold outlines against a dense, rhythmic overspread of imagery like that of babies, barking dogs, flying saucers, hearts, and Mickey Mouse. In his subway drawings and murals, Haring explored themes of exploitation, subjugation, drug abuse, and rising fears of nuclear holocaust, which became increasingly apocalyptic after his AIDS diagnosis. Alongside Jean-Michel Basquiat, Kenny Scharf, and Jenny Holzer, Haring is regarded as a leading figure in New York East Village Art scene in the 1970s and '80s.

Kiki Smith
American, b. 1954
Follow

Using a multitude of mediums and materials, Kiki Smith’s collections are meditations on life and spirituality, often featuring narratives about origins and endings. For the installation Pilgrim (2007-2010), Smith created nearly 30 panels of black and white stained glass supported by steel frames, each representing a stage in a woman’s life and evoking the stations of a pilgrimage. Smith has worked extensively in glass, from the molded sculpture of entangled spermatozoa in Untitled (1989–1990) to the rose window of the Eldridge Street Synagogue (2010) in New York City’s Lower East Side.

William Wegman
American, b. 1943
Follow

Though originally trained in painting, William Wegman is known for his photographic images featuring dogs—primarily his own Weimaraners—in various costumes and poses, and with an array of props. Wegman embarked on a 12-year collaboration with his first dog, Man Ray, who appeared in numerous photographs and videos. In 1986 Wegman acquired a new dog, Fay Ray, beginning a second collaboration in which the artist began using a 20-by-24-inch Polaroid; Wegman’s cast would grow after Fay Ray gave birth to a litter. In Entabled (1988), a Weimaraner is depicted perched demurely on its back atop an antique wooden table, while in Evergreen (2003), Wegman captures his dog’s profile against a stark black background and with a sprig of upside-down foliage balanced on its head. He has also produced artist books in which his dogs feature as the lead characters, as in his much-loved dog version of Cinderella.

Mike Bidlo
American, b. 1953
Follow

A controversial figure known for his appropriation of paintings, sculptures, and performances by 20th-century masters such as Picasso, Warhol, Duchamp, and Pollock, Mike Bidlo approaches iconic modernist works as readymades. Bidlo has staged renowned performances re-enacting Warhol’s Factory and Pollock’s action paintings and famous act of urinating into Peggy Guggenheim’s fireplace. For Matisse/Picasso: A Cross Examination (2003), Bidlo produced large-scale murals of Picasso’s and Matisse’s heads on the walls of MOMA’s PS1, appropriated from the two artists’ self-portraits. A central member of the appropriationist movement in 1980s New York, Bidlo associated with Philip Taaffe and Sherrie Levine. “Tight-assed art historical taboos,” he has said, “I’m interested in exploring and penetrating those taboos.”

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Jean-Michel Basquiat, ‘''Food For The Soup Kitchens'', 1983, Fashion Moda, Exhibition Poster.’, 1983, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
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Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
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About the work
Provenance
VINCE fine arts/ephemera

"Food for the Soup Kitchens", 1983, Fashion Moda, Exhibition Poster,
Offset lithograph on semi-gloss paper, Mounted to foam board with original wood/glass period frame,
17-3/4 × 12 in. (45.1 × 30.5 cm).
Condition:
Excellent- slight age toning (see pics).
Provenance:
Private Collection, NY
Note:
Basquiat created a …

Medium
Print
Condition
Excellent- slight age toning (see pics).
Signature
Not signed, not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Included
Publisher
Privately published, 1983
Jean-Michel Basquiat
American, 1960–1988
Follow

A poet, musician, and graffiti prodigy in late-1970s New York, Jean-Michel Basquiat had honed his signature painting style of obsessive scribbling, elusive symbols and diagrams, and mask-and-skull imagery by the time he was 20. “I don’t think about art while I work,” he once said. “I think about life.” Basquiat drew his subjects from his own Caribbean heritage—his father was Haitian and his mother of Puerto Rican descent—and a convergence of African-American, African, and Aztec cultural histories with Classical themes and contemporary heroes like athletes and musicians. Often associated with Neo-expressionism, Basquiat received massive acclaim in only a few short years, showing alongside artists like Julian Schnabel, David Salle, and Francesco Clemente. In 1983, he met Andy Warhol, who would come to be a mentor and idol. The two collaborated on a series of paintings before Warhol’s death in 1987, followed by Basquiat’s own untimely passing a year later.

Keith Haring
American, 1958–1990
Follow

Bridging the gap between the art world and the street, Keith Haring rose to prominence in the early 1980s with his graffiti drawings made in the subways and on the sidewalks of New York City. Combining the appeal of cartoons with the raw energy of Art Brut artists like Jean DuBuffet, Haring developed a distinct pop-graffiti aesthetic centered on fluid, bold outlines against a dense, rhythmic overspread of imagery like that of babies, barking dogs, flying saucers, hearts, and Mickey Mouse. In his subway drawings and murals, Haring explored themes of exploitation, subjugation, drug abuse, and rising fears of nuclear holocaust, which became increasingly apocalyptic after his AIDS diagnosis. Alongside Jean-Michel Basquiat, Kenny Scharf, and Jenny Holzer, Haring is regarded as a leading figure in New York East Village Art scene in the 1970s and '80s.

Kiki Smith
American, b. 1954
Follow

Using a multitude of mediums and materials, Kiki Smith’s collections are meditations on life and spirituality, often featuring narratives about origins and endings. For the installation Pilgrim (2007-2010), Smith created nearly 30 panels of black and white stained glass supported by steel frames, each representing a stage in a woman’s life and evoking the stations of a pilgrimage. Smith has worked extensively in glass, from the molded sculpture of entangled spermatozoa in Untitled (1989–1990) to the rose window of the Eldridge Street Synagogue (2010) in New York City’s Lower East Side.

William Wegman
American, b. 1943
Follow

Though originally trained in painting, William Wegman is known for his photographic images featuring dogs—primarily his own Weimaraners—in various costumes and poses, and with an array of props. Wegman embarked on a 12-year collaboration with his first dog, Man Ray, who appeared in numerous photographs and videos. In 1986 Wegman acquired a new dog, Fay Ray, beginning a second collaboration in which the artist began using a 20-by-24-inch Polaroid; Wegman’s cast would grow after Fay Ray gave birth to a litter. In Entabled (1988), a Weimaraner is depicted perched demurely on its back atop an antique wooden table, while in Evergreen (2003), Wegman captures his dog’s profile against a stark black background and with a sprig of upside-down foliage balanced on its head. He has also produced artist books in which his dogs feature as the lead characters, as in his much-loved dog version of Cinderella.

Mike Bidlo
American, b. 1953
Follow

A controversial figure known for his appropriation of paintings, sculptures, and performances by 20th-century masters such as Picasso, Warhol, Duchamp, and Pollock, Mike Bidlo approaches iconic modernist works as readymades. Bidlo has staged renowned performances re-enacting Warhol’s Factory and Pollock’s action paintings and famous act of urinating into Peggy Guggenheim’s fireplace. For Matisse/Picasso: A Cross Examination (2003), Bidlo produced large-scale murals of Picasso’s and Matisse’s heads on the walls of MOMA’s PS1, appropriated from the two artists’ self-portraits. A central member of the appropriationist movement in 1980s New York, Bidlo associated with Philip Taaffe and Sherrie Levine. “Tight-assed art historical taboos,” he has said, “I’m interested in exploring and penetrating those taboos.”

''Food For The Soup Kitchens'', 1983, Fashion Moda, Exhibition Poster., 1983

Paper, wood/glass frame
17 3/4 × 12 in
45.1 × 30.5 cm
This is ephemera, an artifact related to the artist.
$5,500
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Have a question? Visit our help center.
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
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