Jean-Michel Basquiat, ‘"New Art. New Money" New York Times Magazine.’, 1985, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Jean-Michel Basquiat, ‘"New Art. New Money" New York Times Magazine.’, 1985, VINCE fine arts/ephemera

New York Magazine, 1985 “New Art, New Money”.
This article gives the sense of the mindset of the art world
in the 1980’s. It chronicles the art market, changes in the players,
the nightlife, and collector habits from the era of the
Abstract Expressionists to the mid-1980s.
The article further describes rise and fall of painting in a
booming art market. A very rare, and historic piece.

Signature: Not signed

Publisher: New York Times

Private Collection, Paris

About Jean-Michel Basquiat

A poet, musician, and graffiti prodigy in late-1970s New York, Jean-Michel Basquiat had honed his signature painting style of obsessive scribbling, elusive symbols and diagrams, and mask-and-skull imagery by the time he was 20. “I don’t think about art while I work,” he once said. “I think about life.” Basquiat drew his subjects from his own Caribbean heritage—his father was Haitian and his mother of Puerto Rican descent—and a convergence of African-American, African, and Aztec cultural histories with Classical themes and contemporary heroes like athletes and musicians. Often associated with Neo-expressionism, Basquiat received massive acclaim in only a few short years, showing alongside artists like Julian Schnabel, David Salle, and Francesco Clemente. In 1983, he met Andy Warhol, who would come to be a mentor and idol. The two collaborated on a series of paintings before Warhol’s death in 1987, followed by Basquiat’s own untimely passing a year later.

American, 1960-1988, New York, New York, based in New York, New York

About Keith Haring

Bridging the gap between the art world and the street, Keith Haring rose to prominence in the early 1980s with his graffiti drawings made in the subways and on the sidewalks of New York City. Combining the appeal of cartoons with the raw energy of Art Brut artists like Jean DuBuffet, Haring developed a distinct pop-graffiti aesthetic centered on fluid, bold outlines against a dense, rhythmic overspread of imagery like that of babies, barking dogs, flying saucers, hearts, and Mickey Mouse. In his subway drawings and murals, Haring explored themes of exploitation, subjugation, drug abuse, and rising fears of nuclear holocaust, which became increasingly apocalyptic after his AIDS diagnosis. Alongside Jean-Michel Basquiat, Kenny Scharf, and Jenny Holzer, Haring is regarded as a leading figure in New York East Village Art scene in the 1970s and '80s.

American, 1958-1990, Reading, Pennsylvania, based in New York, New York

About Kenny Scharf

Muralist, painter, sculptor, and installation artist Kenny Scharf is best known for his fantastical, large-scale paintings of anthropomorphic animals and imagined creatures, as in Viva Mare Viva Mar (2011). Though Scharf’s brightly colored imagery is generally playful, he has remarked that darker themes exist beneath the surface of his works, visible upon closer inspection. Scharf was a part of the 1980s East Village Art movement, along with his good friend and fellow street artist Keith Haring. The artist says he has been influenced by all 20th-century art movements, including Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art, the latter reflected in his appropriation of cartoon characters from television shows like the Flintstones and Jetsons and his humorous depiction of snack food in Maple Glazed Donut Over Fertile Landscape (2011). Scharf’s oftentimes dense and frenetic compositions also echo a Baroque sensibility.

American, b. 1958, Los Angeles, California

About Sandro Chia

Sandro Chia paints in an expressionistic, loosely figurative style emphasizing form and color. Along with Francesco Clemente and Enzo Cucchi, Chia was a central figure in the Italian Transvanguardia movement, a Neo-Expressionist group who sought to re-emphasize color and representation in their work in reaction to the Conceptual Art of the 1980s. He uses vigorous brushstrokes and violent gestures with charcoal and oils, treating his large canvases as vital elements to be worked upon. “My task and my mission […] are to try to reanimate the body of the stretched canvas in front of me, as if it was a symbolic white whale found on a beach,” Chia has said. His subjects range from the everyday to the classical tradition embedded in Italian history.

Italian, b. 1946, Florence, Italy

Solo Shows

2018
Roma,
Sandro Chia Sei Canzoni

Group Shows

2018
Stockholm,

Fair History on Artsy

2015
Cristin Tierney at Expo Chicago 2015
2014
Galleria d'Arte Maggiore G.A.M. at The Armory Show 2014
2013
Galleria d'Arte Maggiore G.A.M. at The Armory Show 2013

About David Salle

Neo-expressionist painter David Salle gained prominence in the 1980s as a leader in the return to figuration, along with contemporaries Julian Schnabel, Francesco Clemente, Eric Fischl, and Jean-Michel Basquiat. He is well known for his large-scale canvases featuring a sparse, seemingly disjunctive arrangement of elements, often including provocatively posed women and nudes and the use of grisaille. Pairing Pop art's common imagery with Surrealism's private associations, Salle's collage-like paintings often gather widely different moods, styles, and sources within one work.

American, b. 1952, Norman, Oklahoma, based in Brooklyn, New York